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Anthropologist Gerhard Hoffstaedter, APARC's Lee Kong Chan NUS-Stanford Fellow on Southeast Asia, discusses his research into the experiences of refugees in Malaysia and their interactions with international institutions.

The European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI) honors Stanford Law School's Milhaupt for his 2023 paper, “The (Geo)Politics of Controlling Shareholders.” Milhaupt, who is a senior fellow, by courtesy, at the Freeman Spogli Institute and a faculty affiliate at Shorenstein APARC, has also been appointed a Fellow of the ECGI.

The Southeast Asia Program at Shorenstein APARC commemorated its 25th anniversary at the conference “Reconsidering Southeast Asia: Issues and Prospects,” gathering leading scholars to examine current trends affecting Southeast Asia’s present and shaping its future.

Researchers including Stanford health economist Karen Eggleston, the director of the Asia Health Policy Program at APARC, find that China’s urban-rural integration policy for social health insurance significantly improved the life satisfaction of rural residents, especially among elderly people and lower-income residents.

Presented by Stanford’s Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, the 23rd Shorenstein Journalism Award recognizes Buckley’s exemplary reporting on societal, cultural, political, foreign policy, and security issues in China and Taiwan.

Through case studies on the People's Liberation Army’s close encounters with the militaries of Australia, India, Japan, the Philippines, Taiwan, and Vietnam, a new National Bureau of Asian Research report edited by Oriana Skylar Mastro assesses the strategic calculus behind the PLA's actions and implications for regional conflict and deterrence.

The Center’s new cohort of nine scholars pursues research spanning diverse topics across contemporary Asia studies.

The Taiwan Program at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center will serve as a Stanford hub and catalyst for multidisciplinary research and teaching about contemporary Taiwan. The program’s inaugural conference convened industry leaders, scholars, and students to examine Taiwan’s challenges and opportunities.

The Trans-Altai Sustainability Dialogue, part of a joint initiative by the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center and the Ban Ki-moon Foundation For a Better Future, convened at the State Palace in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, to stimulate cooperative action towards the cultivation of peace, justice, and strong institutions as outlined in Sustainable Development Goal 16 in the United Nations-adopted 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

A study by Oriana Skylar Mastro, published in the journal Security Studies, offers a novel framework for understanding great power military alignment, reveals the nuances of military cooperation between China and Russia, and dissects its implications for global security.

The Korea Program at APARC brought together celebrity chefs Judy Joo and Ryu Soo-young along with esteemed academics to explore the global ascendance of Korean cuisine and consider how food traverses national and cultural boundaries.

Stanford students got hands-on with Korean cuisine in cooking classes with celebrity chefs Judy Joo and Ryu Soo-young. Hosted by the Korea Program at Shorenstein APARC, the classes followed the conference “Korean Cuisine Gone Global.”

Shorenstein Postdoctoral Fellow Norman Joshua examines how state-society interactions in Indonesia produced an authoritarian political culture, tracing the implications of the country’s enduring legacy of militarization.

The Parliament of Mongolia is convening the Trans-Altai Sustainability Dialogue on April 25-26, 2024, along with Stanford University’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center and the Ban Ki-moon Foundation For a Better Future as co-hosts. The forum will bring together experts across academia, civil society, and government from the United States and Asia to share policy pathways and best practices to strengthen the capacity of institutions to achieve the targets for Sustainable Development Goal 16 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Following the disappointing performance of South Korea’s ruling People Power Party in the April 10 parliamentary elections, Stanford sociologist and APARC Director Gi-Wook Shin analyzes the implications of the election outcomes for President Yoon’s domestic and foreign policies and Korean society and economy.

While China's current policy prioritizes regime security over economic growth, the United States should hold open the door to a shift by Beijing back to a policy package emphasizing openness. Washington should also restore credibility to its One China Policy and lower the rhetorical temperature.

Makoto Iokibe was an esteemed diplomatic historian best known for his pioneering studies on the U.S. post-World War II occupation of Japan, but his influence extended beyond the scholarly world.

Amid North Korea’s increasing provocations, APARC’s Korea Program hosted three experts — Robert Carlin, Victor Cha, and Siegfried Hecker — to consider whether Pyongyang plans to go to war.

The Asahi Shimbun is publishing a series highlighting the Stanford Japan Barometer, a periodic public opinion survey co-developed by Stanford sociologist Kiyoteru Tsutsui and Dartmouth College political scientist Charles Crabtree, which unveils nuanced preferences and evolving attitudes of the Japanese public on political, economic, and social issues.

Alexei Navalny on a march in 2020.
Commentary
Commentary

Though Navalny's heart has stopped, his death cannot erase the impact he made. Alexei was the future and hope of Russia, but what he embodied is eternal. Someday, the dictatorship will die, but Alexei will always live on.