APARC Publications

A collection of books published in Shorenstein APARC in-house monograph series set against the background of Encina Hall entranceway

Shorenstein APARC Publications

Sharing scholarship and insight on pressing Asia-Pacific topics

Our publishing program

We disseminate research and insight by the Shorenstein APARC intellectual community through an active publishing program that includes an array of books, working papers, and policy briefs. In addition, our faculty and researchers publish extensively in peer-reviewed, academic journals and in scholarly and trade presses. They also frequently provide commentary on newsworthy topics affecting Asia and U.S.-Asia relations.

Featured Publications

Cover of the book 'Being in North Korea'

Providing a Unique View into Life in North Korea

Drawing on his extensive in-country experience, Andray Abrahamian’s new book, ‘Being in North Korea,’ addresses the question "What is it like there?", revealing North Koreans as individuals and a North Korea that is changing.
Cover of the book 'The Deer and the Dragon: Southeast Asia and China in the 21st Century'

Analyzing China-Southeast Asia Relations in the 21st Centurry

In Donald K. Emmerson’s new edited volume, ‘The Deer and the Dragon,’ experts explore how Southeast Asian nations are navigating complex challenges in relation to their powerful and increasingly assertive neighbor.
Fateful Decisions: Choices That Will Shape China's Future

Understanding the Determinants of China’s Future Trajectories

Analyzing the factors and constraints that shape Chinese actors’ decisions in managing the daunting challenges they now face, a new volume helps decisionmakers interpret and respond to developments in and by China.

APARC Monograph Series with Stanford University Press

Jointly with Stanford University Press, the Center produces the series Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, featuring academic research by our faculty and scholars.

APARC In-House Series with the Brookings Institution Press

The Center produces a self-published book series featuring policy-relevant research and analysis by our scholars and affiliates. Titles in this series are distributed by Brookings Institution Press.

Publications

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Book

Shifting Gears in Innovation Policy: Strategies from Asia

Yong Suk Lee, Takeo Hoshi, Gi-Wook Shin
2020

In the six Asian countries focused on in this book—China, India, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan—high economic growth has been achieved in many industrial sectors, the catch-up phase of growth has ended or is about to end, and technological frontiers have been reached in many industries. These countries can no longer rely on importing or imitating new technology from abroad and expanding imports, and instead have to develop their own innovations to maintain growth.

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Journal Article

The PLA’s Evolving Role in China’s South China Sea Strategy

Oriana Skylar Mastro, Oriana Skylar Mastro
China Leadership Monitor , 2020

During the past eight months of the global COVID pandemic, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has been active in promoting China’s claims in the South China Sea.  This essay evaluates PLA statements, military exercises and operations, and deployment of relevant platforms and weapons in the South China Sea during this period. I leverage Chinese-language sources in addition to my own operational knowledge from over a decade of military experience to provide greater context for these activities.

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Journal Article

Do University Entrepreneurship Programs Promote Entrepreneurship?

Yong Suk Lee, Charles Eesley, Yong Suk Lee
Strategic Management Journal , 2020

Yong Suk Lee and Charles Eesley examine how university entrepreneurship programs affect entrepreneurial activity using a unique entrepreneurship‐focused survey of Stanford alumni. OLS regressions find a positive relationship between program participation and entrepreneurship activities. However, endogeneity hinders causal interpretation. They utilize the fact that the entrepreneurship programs were implemented at the school level.

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Working Paper

The Effects of India’s COVID-19 Lockdown on Critical Non-COVID Health Care and Outcomes

Radhika Jain, Pascaline Dupas
Asia Health Policy Program working paper # 60 , 2020

India’s COVID-19 lockdown is widely believed to have disrupted critical health services, but its effect on non-COVID health outcomes is largely unknown. Comparing mortality trends among dialysis patients in the eight months around the lockdown with the previous year, we document a 64% increase in mortality between March and May 2020 and an estimated 22-25% total excess mortality through July 2020. The mortality increase is greater among females and disadvantaged groups.

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Policy Brief

Exploring India's Strategic Futures

Arzan Tarapore
The National Bureau of Asian Research - Special Report no. 88 , 2020
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Book

The Deer and the Dragon: Southeast Asia and China in the 21st Century

Donald K. Emmerson
2020

Southeast Asia is arguably the most diverse region in the world. Accordingly, rather than addressing the exact same question, the contributors to this volume have — as experts on Southeast Asia-China relations — explored the matters they see as most important and most deserving of exploration and exposure. After the editor’s introduction, the chapters proceed in pairs. Each pair and a closing chapter cover a distinctive theme in Southeast Asia’s interactions with China.

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Book

Being in North Korea

Andray Abrahamian
2020

**See our dedicated book page for more information about the book, including praise, reviews, and author commentary.**

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Journal Article

South Korea's Democratic Decay

Gi-Wook Shin
The Journal of Democracy , 2020

South Korea (hereafter Korea) is following global trends as it slides toward a “democratic depression.” Both the spirit of democracy and actual liberal-democratic standards are under attack. The symptoms of democratic decline are increasingly hard to miss, and they are appearing in many corners of Korean society, the hallmarks of zero-sum politics in which opponents are demonized, democratic norms are eroded, and political life grows ever more polarized.

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Journal Article

Future Projection of the Health and Functional Status of Older People in Japan: A Multistate Transition Microsimulation Model with Repeated Cross‐sectional Data

Megumi Kasajima, Hideki Hashimoto, Sze‐Chuan Suen, Brian Chen, Hawre Jalal, Karen Eggleston, Jay Bhattacharya
Health Economics , 2020

Accurate future projections of population health are imperative to plan for the future healthcare needs of a rapidly aging population. Multistate‐transition microsimulation models, such as the U.S. Future Elderly Model, address this need but require high‐quality panel data for calibration. We develop an alternative method that relaxes this data requirement, using repeated cross‐sectional representative surveys to estimate multistate‐transition contingency tables applied to Japan's population.

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Commentary

After COVID-19: Rebooting Business in China

Jennifer Choo, Jean C. Oi, Christopher Thomas, Xue (Xander) Wu
2020

To explore how business leaders and entrepreneurs in China responded to the COVID-19 lockdown and how they’re planning for the future, the China Program conducted a survey in coordination with the Stanford Center at Peking University and Stanford Business School alumni Christopher Thomas and Xue (Xander) Wu.

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Commentary

疫情之后: 企业的重振与美中​经济​关系前景

Jennifer Choo, Jean C. Oi, Christopher Thomas, Xue (Xander) Wu
2020

To explore how business leaders and entrepreneurs in China responded to the COVID-19 lockdown and how they’re planning for the future, the China Program conducted a survey in coordination with the Stanford Center at Peking University and Stanford Business School alumni Christopher Thomas and Xue (Xander) Wu.

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Working Paper

Intended and Unintended Consequences of a New Limit on Working Hours in South Korea: Implications for Precarious Employment

Sungchul Park, Hansoo Ko
Asia Health Policy Program working paper # 59 , 2020

Effective as of July 1, 2018, South Korea set a new cap on employees’ weekly working hours, decreasing the maximum number from 68 to 52. In this study, we comprehensively analyze the effectiveness of the law’s implementation by observing changes in work time, health status, health care utilization, health behavior, monthly expenses, and satisfaction between pre- and post-implementation periods (2014–2017 vs. 2019). We find evidence of both intended and unintended consequences—and, in this last category, some are beneficial and some not.

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Working Paper

COVID-19 Incidence and the Timing of Quarantine Measures and Travel Restrictions: A Cross-country Analysis

Marjorie Pajaron
Asia Health Policy Program working paper # 58 , 2020

COVID-19 presents humanity with not just a health crisis but also a governance crisis as leaders around the globe confront the challenges of stemming the spread of the virus. Various governments have responded in various ways to slow the transmission of the virus. Ideally, the leaders of a country should approach the crisis with a two-pronged attack. The first is to flatten the epidemic curve (epi curve), which is simply a graphical representation of the number of cases and date of onset of the illness, and the second is to raise or strengthen the capacity of the health system. 

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Book

Healthy Aging in Asia

Karen Eggleston
2020
Life expectancy in Japan, South Korea, and much of urban China has now outpaced that of the United States and other high-income countries. With this triumph of longevity, however, comes a rise in the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) like diabetes and hypertension, reducing healthy life years for individuals in these aging populations, as well as challenging the healthcare systems they rely on for appropriate care.  
 
The challenges and disparities are even more pressing in low- and middle-income economies, such as rural China and India.
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Working Paper

Intention to Pay for HPV Vaccination among Women of Childbearing Age in Vietnam

Xuan Thi Thanh Le, Phuong Thi Ngoc Nguyen, Toan Thi Thanh Do, Thang Huu Nguyen, Huong Thi Le, Cuong Tat Nguyen, Giang Hai Ha, Chi Linh Hoang, Bach Xuan Tran, Carl A. Latkin, Roger C.M. Ho, Cyrus S.H. Ho
Asia Health Policy Program working paper # 57 , 2020

The intention to pay for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among women of childbearing age in Vietnam, where cervical cancer remains a significant public health concern, has been mostly lacking. To examine this issue, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 807 pregnant women in an urban and a rural district (Dong Da and Ba Vi) of Hanoi, Vietnam. The vast percentage of our respondents expressed a firm intention to vaccinate, especially women in rural areas (over 90.0%).

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Journal Article

China’s Challenges: Now It Gets Much Harder

Thomas Fingar, Jean C. Oi
The Washington Quarterly , 2020

The easy phases of China’s quest for wealth and power are over. After forty years, every one of a set of favorable conditions has diminished or vanished, and China’s future, neither inevitable nor immutable, will be shaped by the policy choices of party leaders facing at least eleven difficult challenges, including the novel coronavirus. 

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Journal Article

Smoking, Life Expectancy, and Chronic Disease in South Korea, Singapore, and the United States: A Microsimulation Model

Daejung Kim, Cynthia Chen, Bryan Tysinger, Sungchul Park, Ming Zhe Chong, Lijia Wang, Michelle Zhao, Jian-Min Yuan, Woon-Puay Koh, Joanne Yoong, Jay Bhattacharya, Karen Eggleston
Health Economics , 2019

The substantial social and economic burden attributable to smoking is well‐known, with heavy smokers at higher risk of chronic disease and premature mortality than light smokers and nonsmokers. In aging societies with high rates of male smoking such as in East Asia, smoking is a leading preventable risk factor for extending lives (including work‐lives) and healthy aging.

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Journal Article

Healing One-Fifth of Humanity: Progress and Challenges for China's Health System

Karen Eggleston,
Milken Institute Review , 2019

In the 2019 fourth quarter edition of the Milken Institute Review, Asia Health Policy Program director Karen Eggleston discusses the progress China has made since the 2009 reforms to its healthcare, which brought basic coverage to all and reduced patients' share of costs, and explains the many challenges that remain, including increasing the system's efficiency to ensure its sustainability and addressing the disparities in healthcare that echo the "yawning gap in living standards between China's rising middle class and its poorest citizens."

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Working Paper

Healing One-fifth of Humanity: Progress and Challenges for China’s Health System

Karen Eggleston, Karen Eggleston
Asia Health Policy Program working paper # 56 , 2019

China’s national health reforms over the past two decades have brought the system closer to the modern, safe, reliable and accessible health system that is commensurate with China’s dramatic economic growth, improvement in living standards, and high hopes for the next generation.

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Book

Understanding "Value for Money" in Healthy Ageing (chapter in ebook)

Karen Eggleston,
2019

In Live Long and Prosper?, a new eBook edited by David Bloom, AHPP director Karen Eggleston contributes the chapter "Understanding 'Value for Money' in Healthy Ageing," in which she advocates for and explains the concept of "net value of medical care," a metric that helps quantify the social value of spending on healthcare.

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Book

Agents of Disorder: Inside China's Cultural Revolution

Andrew G. Walder,
2019

By May 1966, just seventeen years after its founding, the People’s Republic of China had become one of the most powerfully centralized states in modern history. But that summer everything changed. Mao Zedong called for students to attack intellectuals and officials who allegedly lacked commitment to revolutionary principles. Rebels responded by toppling local governments across the country, ushering in nearly two years of conflict that in places came close to civil war and resulted in nearly 1.6 million dead.

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Journal Article

Korea’s Migrants: From Homogeneity to Diversity – An Asian Survey Special Section

Gi-Wook Shin, Rennie Moon
Asian Survey , 2019

Korea’s migrants have diversified in recent decades. A special section of the journal Asian Survey gathers articles that address this development by examining issues of class as an analytical lens in addition to ethnicity and citizenship, and also by considering the contributions of migrants from both human and social capital perspectives. By doing so, the authors aim to provide a better understanding of the varied experiences, realities, and complexities of Korea’s increasingly diverse migrant groups.

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Journal Article

Skilled Migrants as Human and Social Capital in Korea

Gi-Wook Shin, Joon Nak Choi, Rennie Moon
Asian Survey , 2019
South Korea faces a shortage of highly skilled labor, but with a low tolerance for diversity, it lags behind in its global competitiveness to retain mobile skilled talent.
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Book

"New Missions, New Challenges, 2005-2008" (chapter in the book Truth to Power)

Thomas Fingar
2019

Truth to Power, the first-ever history of the U.S. National Intelligence Council (NIC), is told through the reflections of its eight Chairs in the period from the end of the Cold War until 2017. Co-editors Robert Hutchings and Gregory Treverton add a substantial introduction placing the NIC in its historical context going all the way back to the Board of National Estimates in the 1940s, as well as a concluding chapter that highlights key themes and judgments.

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