Shorenstein APARC Studies with Stanford University Press

3D cover mockups of books in APARC's joint series with Stanford University Press and Stanford archway set as background.

Shorenstein APARC Studies with Stanford University Press

Shorenstein APARC and Stanford University Press jointly produce a series of books titled Studies of the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center. Designed to spotlight APARC academic research, the series features the varied research of the Center’s faculty, scholars, and fellows, and the unique interdisciplinary, policy-oriented perspective that informs it. APARC faculty and China scholar Andrew Walder, who edits the series, notes, “We are delighted with this joint series with Stanford University Press, which has a large and distinguished list of books on modern Asia. It is a perfect way to showcase the best of the scholarly work coming out of Shorenstein APARC.”

Publications

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Books

United Front

Paul Schuler
2021 January 29, 2021

Projecting Solidarity through Deliberation in Vietnam’s Single-Party Legislature

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Books

Manipulating Globalization: The Influence of Bureaucrats on Business in China

Chen, Ling
Stanford University Press, 2018 June 18, 2018

The era of globalization saw China emerge as the world's manufacturing titan. However, the "made in China" model—with its reliance on cheap labor and thin profits—has begun to wane. Beginning in the 2000s, the Chinese state shifted from attracting foreign investment to promoting the technological competitiveness of domestic firms. This shift caused tensions between winners and losers, leading local bureaucrats to compete for resources in government budget, funding, and tax breaks.

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Books

Poisonous Pandas: Chinese Cigarette Manufacturing in Critical Historical Perspectives

Matthew Kohrman, Gan Quan, Liu Wennan, Robert Proctor
Stanford University Press, 2018 May 29, 2018
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Books

Uneasy Partnerships: China’s Engagement with Japan, the Koreas, and Russia in the Era of Reform

Thomas Fingar
Stanford University Press, 2017 April 11, 2017

Uneasy Partnerships presents the analysis and insights of practitioners and scholars who have shaped and examined China's interactions with key Northeast Asian partners. Using the same empirical approach employed in the companion volume, The New Great Game (Stanford University Press, 2016), this new text analyzes the perceptions, priorities, and policies of China and its partners to explain why dyadic relationships evolved as they have during China's "rise."

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Books

Divergent Memories: Opinion Leaders and the Asia-Pacific War

Gi-Wook Shin, Daniel C. Sneider
Stanford University Press, 2016 July 12, 2016

No nation is free from the charge that it has a less-than-complete view of the past. History is not simply about recording past events—it is often contested, negotiated, and reshaped over time. The debate over the history of World War II in Asia remains surprisingly intense, and Divergent Memories examines the opinions of powerful individuals to pinpoint the sources of conflict: from Japanese colonialism in Korea and atrocities in China to the American decision to use atomic weapons against Japan.

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Books

Contested Embrace: Transborder Membership Politics in Twentieth-Century Korea

Jaeeun Kim
Stanford University Press, 2016 July 12, 2016

Scholars have long examined the relationship between nation-states and their "internal others," such as immigrants and ethno-racial minorities. Contested Embrace shifts the analytic focus to explore how a state relates to people it views as "external members" such as emigrants and diasporas. Specifically, Jaeeun Kim analyzes disputes over the belonging of Koreans in Japan and China, focusing on their contested relationship with the colonial and postcolonial states in the Korean peninsula.

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Books

The New Great Game: China and South and Central Asia in the Era of Reform

Thomas Fingar
Stanford University Press, 2016 March 9, 2016
China's rise has elicited envy, admiration, and fear among its neighbors. Although much has been written about this, previous coverage portrays events as determined almost entirely by Beijing. Such accounts minimize or ignore the other side of the equation: namely, what individuals, corporate actors, and governments in other countries do to attract, shape, exploit, or deflect Chinese involvement. The New Great Game analyzes and explains how Chinese policies and priorities interact with the goals and actions of other countries in the region.
 
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Books

The Colonial Origins of Ethnic Violence in India

Ajay Verghese
Stanford University Press, 2016 March 1, 2016

The neighboring north Indian districts of Jaipur and Ajmer are identical in language, geography, and religious and caste demography. But when the famous Babri Mosque in Ayodhya was destroyed in 1992, Jaipur burned while Ajmer remained peaceful; when the state clashed over low-caste affirmative action quotas in 2008, Ajmer's residents rioted while Jaipur's citizens stayed calm. What explains these divergent patterns of ethnic conflict across multiethnic states?

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Books

Rebranding Islam: Piety, Prosperity, and a Self-Help Guru

James Hoesterey
Stanford University Press, 2015 November 1, 2015

Kyai Haji Abdullah Gymnastiar, known affectionately by Indonesians as "Aa Gym" (elder brother Gym), rose to fame via nationally televised sermons, best-selling books, and corporate training seminars. In Rebranding Islam James B.

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Books

Protest Dialectics: State Repression and South Korea's Democracy Movement, 1970–1979

Paul Chang
Stanford University Press, 2015 April 20, 2015

1970s South Korea is characterized by many as the "dark age for democracy." Most scholarship on South Korea's democracy movement and civil society has focused on the "student revolution" in 1960 and the large protest cycles in the 1980s which were followed by Korea's transition to democracy in 1987. But in his groundbreaking work of political and social history of 1970s South Korea, Paul Chang highlights the importance of understanding the emergence and evolution of the democracy movement in this oft-ignored decade.

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Books

Global Talent: Skilled Labor as Social Capital in Korea

Gi-Wook Shin, Joon Nak Choi
Stanford University Press, 2015 March 6, 2015

Global Talent seeks to examine the utility of skilled foreigners beyond their human capital value by focusing on their social capital potential, especially their role as transnational bridges between host and home countries.

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Books

Failed Democratization in Prewar Japan: Breakdown of a Hybrid Regime

Harukata Takanaka
Stanford University Press, 2014 August 1, 2014

Failed Democratization in Prewar Japan presents a compelling case study on change in political regimes through its exploration of Japan's transition to democracy. Within a broad-ranging examination of Japan's "semi-democratic" political system from 1918 to 1932, when political parties tended to dominate the government, the book analyzes in detail why this system collapsed in 1932 and discusses the implications of the failure.

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Books

New Challenges for Maturing Democracies in Korea and Taiwan

Larry Diamond, Gi-Wook Shin
Stanford University Press, 2014 January 1, 2014

New Challenges for Maturing Democracies in Korea and Taiwan takes a creative and comparative view of the new challenges and dynamics confronting these maturing democracies.

Numerous works deal with political change in the two societies individually, but few adopt a comparative approach—and most focus mainly on the emergence of democracy or the politics of the democratization processes. This book, utilizing a broad, interdisciplinary approach, pays careful attention to post-democratization phenomena and the key issues that arise in maturing democracies.

“As two paradigmatic cases of democratic development, Korea and Taiwan are often seen as exemplars of both modernization and democratization. This volume both contributes and moves beyond this focus, looking forward to assess the maturation but also the risks to democracy in both countries. With its strong comparative focus and a sober appreciation of how hard it can be not to just to attain but to sustain democracy, it represents a major contribution."  

     — Benjamin Reilly, Dean, Sir Walter Murdoch School of Public Policy and International Affairs, Murdoch University

What emerges is a picture of two evolving democracies, now secure, but still imperfect and at times disappointing to their citizens—a common feature and challenge of democratic maturation. The book demonstrates that it will fall to the elected political leaders of these two countries to rise above narrow and immediate party interests to mobilize consensus and craft policies that will guide the structural adaptation and reinvigoration of the society and economy in an era that clearly presents for both countries not only steep challenges but also new opportunities.

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Larry Diamond is a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford. He is also Director of Stanford's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Gi-Wook Shin is Director of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, the Tong Yang, Korea Foundation, and Korea Stanford Alumni Chair of Korean Studies, and Professor of Sociology at Stanford.

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Books

The Institutional Imperative: The Politics of Equitable Development in Southeast Asia

Erik Kuhonta
Stanford University Press, 2011 August 1, 2011

Why do some countries in the developing world achieve growth with equity, while others do not? If democracy is the supposed panacea for the developing world, why have Southeast Asian democracies had such uneven results? In exploring these questions, political scientist Erik Martinez Kuhonta argues that the realization of equitable development hinges heavily on strong institutions, particularly institutionalized political parties and cohesive interventionist states, and on moderate policy and ideology.

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Books

Spending Without Taxation: FILP and the Politics of Public Finance in Japan

Gene Park
Stanford University Press, 2011 March 1, 2011

Governments confront difficult political choices when they must determine how to balance their spending. But what would happen if a government found a means of spending without taxation? In this book, Gene Park demonstrates how the Japanese government established and mobilized an enormous off-budget spending system, the Fiscal Investment Loan Program (FILP), which drew on postal savings, public pensions, and other funds to pay for its priorities and reduce demands on the budget.

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Books

Collective Resistance in China: Why Popular Protests Succeed or Fail

Yongshun Cai
Stanford University Press, 2010 February 1, 2010

Although academics have paid much attention to contentious politics in China and elsewhere, research on the outcomes of social protests, both direct and indirect, in non-democracies is still limited. In this new work, Yongshun Cai combines original fieldwork with secondary sources to examine how social protest has become a viable method of resistance in China and, more importantly, why some collective actions succeed while others fail.

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Books

One Alliance, Two Lenses: U.S.-Korea Relations in a New Era

Gi-Wook Shin
Stanford University Press, 2010 January 1, 2010

One Alliance, Two Lenses examines U.S.-Korea relations in a short but dramatic period (1992-2003) that witnessed the end of the Cold War, South Korea's full democratization, inter-Korean engagement, two nuclear crises, and the start of the U.S. war on terror. These events have led to a new era of challenges and opportunities for U.S.-South Korea (ROK) relations.

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Books

Islamism: Contested Perspectives on Political Islam

Richard C. Martin, Abbas Barzegar, Donald K. Emmerson, Daniel M. Varisco
Stanford University Press, 2009 November 1, 2009

As America struggles to understand Islam and Muslims on the world stage, one concept in particular dominates public discourse: Islamism. References to Islamism and Islamists abound in the media, in think tanks, and in the general study of Islam, but opinions vary on the differences of degree and kind among those labeled Islamists. This book debates what exactly is said when we use this contentious term in discussing Muslim religion, tradition, and social conflict.

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Books

Southeast Asia in Political Science: Terms of Enlistment

Donald K. Emmerson
Stanford University Press in "Southeast Asia in Political Science: Theory, Region, and Qualitative Analysis", 2008 July 1, 2008

Co-published by the East-West Center, this book originated in a 2004 conference convened by the Southeast Asia Forum (SEAF) at Shorenstein APARC.

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Books

At the Crossroads of Empires: Middlemen, Social Networks, and State-building in Republican Shanghai

Jean C. Oi, Nara Dillon
Stanford University Press, 2007 December 1, 2007

To a degree uncommon in among Chinese cities, Republican Shanghai had no center. Its territory was divided among three (sometimes more) municipal governments integrated into various national states and empires. No government building or religious institution gave Shanghai a "center." Yet amidst deep cleavages, the city functioned as a coherent whole. What held Shanghai together? The authors' answer is that a group of middlemen with myriad connections across political and social boundaries created networks that held Republican Shanghai together.

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Books

Making IT: The Rise of Asia in High Tech

Henry S. Rowen, William F. Miller, Marguerite Gong Hancock
Stanford University Press, 2006 November 1, 2006

In 2003, consumption of IT goods worldwide was $1.5 trillion. Asia represented twenty percent of this total. Even more telling, Asia produced about forty percent of these goods. The continued rise of Asian IT innovation will pose a challenge to the eminence of traditional IT centers, notably Silicon Valley.

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Books

Chinese Cultural Revolution as History, The

Joseph W. Esherick, Paul G. Pickowicz, Andrew G. Walder
Stanford University Press: Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2006 March 1, 2006

Based on a wide variety of unusual and only recently available sources, this book covers the entire Cultural Revolution decade (1966-76) and shows how the Cultural Revolution was experienced by ordinary Chinese at the base of urban and rural society. The contributors emphasize the comple interaction of state and society during this tumultuous period, exploring the way that events originating at the center of political power changed people's lives and how, in turn, people's responses took the Cultural Revolution in unplanned and unanticipated directions.

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Books

Ethnic Nationalism in Korea: Genealogy, Politics, and Legacy

Gi-Wook Shin
Stanford University Press: Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2006 March 1, 2006

This book explains the roots, politics, and legacy of Korean ethnic nationalism, which is based on the sense of a shared bloodline and ancestry. Belief in a racially distinct and ethnically homogeneous nation is widely shared on both sides of the Korean peninsula, although some scholars believe it is a myth with little historical basis.

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