A collection of books published in Shorenstein APARC in-house monograph series set against the background of Encina Hall entranceway.

Shorenstein APARC Publications

Sharing scholarship and insight on pressing Asia-Pacific topics

Our publishing program

We disseminate research and insight by the Shorenstein APARC intellectual community through an active publishing program that includes an array of books, working papers, and policy briefs. In addition, our faculty and researchers publish extensively in peer-reviewed, academic journals and in scholarly and trade presses. They also frequently provide commentary on newsworthy topics affecting Asia and U.S.-Asia relations.

Featured Publications

Man smokes while playing an erxian

Poisonous Pandas: Chinese Cigarette Manufacturing in Critical Historical Perspectives

In this volume, leading scholars investigate the proliferation of cigarette manufacturing over the last fifty years. Focusing on China, the world’s largest manufacturer and consumer of cigarettes, they uncover new knowledge about the sources of the greatest health crisis of our day and how it may be quashed.
Solar plant in Shuzenji, Izu, Japan, with Mt Fuji visible in the  background.

The Politics of Energy and Climate Change in Japan under Abe: Abenergynomics

In this Asian Survey article, Phillip Lipscy and co-author Trevor Incerti show how Prime Minister Abe has used energy policy to support the growth objectives of Abenomics and shape Japanese policy on nuclear power, electricity deregulation, renewable energy, and climate change.
Creative image of a DNA strand against a graph background

Economic Dimensions of Personalized and Precision Medicine in Asia

This paper, co-authored by APARC Deputy Director Karen Eggleston, examines the extent of pharmaceutical company coverage of cancer testing and its impact on patient access to treatment in Taiwan. It is a chapter in a National Bureau of Economic Research book forthcoming from University of Chicago Press.

APARC Monograph Series with Stanford University Press

Jointly with Stanford University Press, the Center produces the series Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, featuring academic research by our faculty and scholars.

APARC In-House Series with the Brookings Institution Press

The Center produces a self-published book series featuring policy-relevant research and analysis by our scholars and affiliates. Titles in this series are distributed by Brookings Institution Press.

Publications

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Journal Article

Daniel C. Sneider
Asia-Pacific Review, 2013

The treatment of the wartime period in Japan's history textbooks has long been a subject of debate and controversy, even a source of international tension. Since their creation, history textbooks have been used to shape national identity and encourage patriotism. This article, drawing on the comparative study of high school history textbooks in Japan, China, South Korea, Taiwan and the United States by Stanford's "Divided Memories and Reconciliation" project, compares the treatment of the wartime period in the textbooks of China and Japan.

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Working Paper

Minoru Aosaki
Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2013

This paper discusses economic impacts and policy challenges related to implementing Basel III, the new international standard of banking regulation, in the United States, Japan, and the European Union. The G20 leaders endorsed Basel III in late 2010 and currently national regulators are translating it into their national laws and regulations. A key issue is whether regulators can persuade their national legislatures and industries of the merits of Basel III.

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Book

Takeo Hoshi, Anil K. Kashyap
Nihon Keizai Shimbun, 2013

日本経済が現在直面する課題は、19世紀半ばの開国、1920年代の混乱、第二次世界大戦による荒廃といった歴史的転換に匹敵する。

長期的視点から「日本の失敗」の原因を究明し、成長への総合的な政策を提示する。

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Journal Article

Phillip Lipscy, Lee Schipper
Energy Policy, 2013

Phillip Y. Lipscy and Lee Schipper examine energy efficiency in the Japanese transportation sector since the 1970s. Comparisons with the United States and other developed economies illustrate that Japan primarily stands out due to low activity levels and modal structure rather than modal energy intensity. On-road automobile energy intensity has shown little improvement, albeit from a low base, over the past four decades. They also consider policy measures undertaken by the Japanese government.

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Book

Sang-Hun Choe, Gi-Wook Shin, David Straub
Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2013

Kim Jong-il once declared he would transform North Korea into a "great and powerful country" by 2012, apparently believing that nuclear weapons would compel the international community to engage on his terms. With no such prospect in sight, North Korea faces a multitude of intractable problems. Will North Koreans accept his son as their leader, and will he embrace new thinking to solve the country's problems? Why do North Korean leaders resist reform of an economic system that impoverishes the people? Can a country so dependent on outside help continue to defy the international community?

In Troubled Transition, leading international experts examine these dilemmas, offering new insights into how a troubled North Korea may evolve in light of the ways other command economies and totalitarian states--from the Soviet Union and East Germany to Vietnam and China--have transitioned.

The publication of Troubled Transition was made possible by the generosity of the Koret Foundation of San Francisco, CA.

Examination copies: Shorenstein APARC books are distributed by the Brookings Institution Press. You can obtain information on obtaining an examination copy at their website.

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Book

Joon-woo Park, Gi-Wook Shin, Don Keyser
Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2013

South Korea and Vietnam established diplomatic relations only twenty years ago. Today these former adversaries enjoy unexpectedly cordial and rapidly expanding bilateral ties. Leaders of the two nations—perceiving broadly shared interests and no fundamental conflicts—seek to leverage their subregional influence on behalf of common or complementary policy goals. Today they often profess a “middle power” identity as they explain their foreign policy in terms of such classical middle power goals as regional peace, integration, and common goods.

Broadly similar in many respects, South Korea and Vietnam are nonetheless sufficiently different that a comparison can yield interesting insights—yet there is a dearth of systematic comparative work on the two. While holding a range of views on the contentious concepts of middle power and national identity, the contributors to Asia’s Middle Powers? help readers, both academic and policy practitioners, to gain an enhanced appreciation of South Korea and Vietnam’s regional behavior and international strategies

The publication of Asia's Middle Powers was made possible by the generosity of the Koret Foundation of San Francisco, CA.

Examination copies: Shorenstein APARC books are distributed by the Brookings Institution Press. You can obtain information on obtaining an examination copy at their website.

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Journal Article

Takeo Hoshi, Takatoshi Ito
Asian Economic Policy Review, 2013

This paper presents a simulation model based on the growth rate, the inflation rate, and the consumption tax rate in the future. Future tax revenues and fiscal expenditures are projected using regression models estimated from past data. The fiscal situation is called unsustainable if the outstanding amount of Japanese government bonds (JGBs) becomes higher than the level of private sector financial assets. We focus on the general account of the central government, which is the source of JGB issues.

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Book

Kenji E. Kushida, Kay Shimizu, Jean C. Oi
Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2013

Japan’s first decade of the twenty-first century was both disappointing and bewildering, producing wildly contrasting evaluations. Many have come to call this period the “second lost decade,” characterized by policy paralysis and overall lackluster economic growth.

For those studying Japan more closely, however, the same decades reveal nothing short of a broad transformation in numerous core tenets of Japan’s postwar political economy. How can we best capture this transformation?

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Working Paper

Brian K. Chen, Karen Eggleston
Asia Health Policy Program working paper # 37, 2013

How do demand- and supply-side incentives interact, when there are potentially large provider income effects? We develop a simple model and empirically test it with data from China’s Essential Medications List (EML) policy, which reduced patient copayments and changed provider incentives by removing a large source of revenue from primary care providers: drug dispensing revenues.

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Working Paper

Tetsuji Yamada, Chia-Ching Chen, Chie Hanaoka, Seiritsu Ogura
Asia Health Policy Program working paper # 36, 2013

Background: For the past two decades, more and more women in certain European countries, Japan, and the United States are giving birth to their first child at a considerably later age than ever before. It remains unclear as to what extent this age-related general fertility decline is affected by changing social and cultural norms.

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Book

Kenji E. Kushida, Phillip Lipscy
Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2013

The Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) came to power in 2009 with a commanding majority, ending fifty years of almost uninterrupted Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) rule. Then, in 2012, just over three years later, the DPJ lost power in an equally stunning landslide loss to the LDP. This volume examines the DPJ’s remarkable ascendance, its policies once in power, and its dramatic fall.

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Working Paper

Marjorie Pajaron
Asia Health Policy Program working paper # 35, 2013

This paper shows that the individual’s bargaining power within the household, proxied by gender and educational attainment of household head, affects how remittances sent by Overseas Filipino Workers are spent in the Philippines. Gender of the household head, not of the remitter, matters in the allocation of remittances.

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Journal Article

Donald K. Emmerson
Journal of Democracy, 2013
"Kishore Mahbubani is well known and well credentialed. The widely published dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore has been listed among the 'top 100 global thinkers' by Foreign Policy magazine not once but thrice—in 2005, 2010, and 2011. In praising one of Mahbubani’s books, Harvard professor Larry Summers stated that 'there is no more thoughtful observer of Asia, the United States, and their interaction than Kishore Mahbubani.'”
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Journal Article

Kenji E. Kushida, John Zysman
Japan Spotlight, 2013

In our current era, the advent of digital technologies and accelerating globalization is driving ever-faster commoditization of firms and products.  With rapidly improving Information and Communications Technology (ICT) tools, manufacturing is decomposed with finer granularity, and corporate functions can be outsourced and offshored more than ever before.  Services can be unbundled into activities that can be taken apart, reconfigured, and transformed with the application of algorithms.  Overall, firms are experiencing accelerating shifts in the sweet-spot for markets and business models in

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Journal Article

Karen Eggleston, Jean C. Oi, Scott Rozelle, Andrew G. Walder, Xueguang Zhou, Ang Sun
The Journal of Asian Studies, 2013

China's population of 1.34 billion is now 50 percent urban, over 13 percent above age 60, and with 118 boys born for every 100 girls. For such a large population at a relatively low level of per capita income, how will aging interact with substantial gender imbalance and rapid urbanization?

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Journal Article

Phillip Lipscy, Kenji E. Kushida, Trevor Incerti
Environmental Science & Technology, 2013

We consider the vulnerability of nuclear power plants to a disaster like the one that occurred at Fukushima Daiichi. Examination of Japanese nuclear plants affected by the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011 shows that three variables were crucial at the early stages of the crisis: plant elevation, sea wall elevation, and location and status of backup generators. Higher elevations for these variables, or waterproof protection of backup generators, could have mitigated or prevented the disaster.

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Journal Article

Kenji E. Kushida
Japanese Political Economy, 2013

The Fukushima nuclear disaster was a critical juncture in the world’s relationship with nuclear energy, as well as Japan’s postwar political economy, society, and national psyche. The DPJ, and particularly Prime Minister Kan, were later widely criticized for mismanaging the disaster, contributing to the party’s loss of power. This paper closely examines the crisis as it unfolded, assessing the degree to which the government’s chaotic response can be attributed to the DPJ’s political leadership.

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Working Paper

Jun Wang, Qiong Zhang, Ying Chen
Asia Health Policy Program working paper # 34, 2013

"Old while not affluent" situation, together with an unsustainable high investment rate and high dependency on foreign trade, spurs hot debates on the challenges of a fast-aging population and the exploitation of the second demographic dividend in today’s China. Literature related to elderly health in countries other than China often starts with medical concepts and then dwells on economic issues, mainly focusing on socioeconomic, behavioral, and environmental factors and their effects on the health of the elderly.

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Journal Article

Kai-Wen Cheng, Janice Y. Tsoh, Wenlong Cui, Xiaoliang Li, Matthew Kohrman
Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health, 2013

Introduction. This study investigated the intensity of cigarette consumption and its correlates in China among urban male factory workers, a cohort especially vulnerable to tobacco exposure, one that appears to have benefitted little from recent public health efforts to reduce smoking rates.

Methods. Data were collected from men working in factories of Kunming city, Yunnan, China, who are current daily smokers (N = 490). A multinomial logistic regression was conducted to examine the factors in association with smoking intensity in light, moderate, and heavy levels.

Results. Light smoking correlated with social smoking, smoking the first cigarette later in the day, self-reported health condition, and quit intention. Heavy smoking was associated with purchase of lower priced cigarettes, difficulty refraining from smoking, and prehypertensive blood pressure.

Conclusion. Even in regions where smoking is highly prevalent, even among cohorts who smoke heavily, variation exists in how cigarettes are consumed. Analyses of this consumption, with special consideration given to smoking intensity and its correlates, can help guide tobacco-control strategists in developing more effective interventions.

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Book

Kenji E. Kushida, Stuart Feldman, Jonathan Murray, John Zysman, Niels Christian Nielsen
Oxford University Press in "The Third Globalization: Can Wealthy Nations Stay Rich in the Twenty-First Century?", 2013

A fundamental transformation of services is underway, driven by developments in information and communications technology (ICT) tools, the uses to which they are being put, and the networks on which they run. Services were once considered a sinkhole of the economy, immune to significant technological or organizational productivity increases. Now, they are widely recognized as a source of productivity growth and dynamism in the economy that is changing the structure of employment, the division of labor, and the character of work and its location.

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Journal Article

Masahiko Aoki
Socio-Economic Review, 2013

This article first provides a game-theoretic, endogenous view of institutions and then applies the idea to identify the sources of institutional trajectories of economies development in China, Japan, and Korea. It stylises the Malthusian phase of the East Asian economies as a peasant-based economies in which small conjugal families self-managed their working times between farming on small plots—leased or owned—and handcrafting for personal consumption and markets. It then compares institutional arrangements across these economies that sustained otherwise similar economies.

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Journal Article

Masahiko Aoki, Geoffrey Rothwell
Energy Policy, 2013

This paper analyzes the causes, responses, and consequences of the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident (March 2011) by comparing these with Three Mile Island (March 1979) and Chernobyl (April 1986). We identify three generic modes of organizational coordination: modular, vertical, and horizontal. By relying on comparative institutional analysis, we compare the modes' performance characteristics in terms of short-term and long-term coordination, preparedness for shocks, and responsiveness to shocks.

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Journal Article

Thomas Fingar, Fan Jishe
The Washington Quarterly, 2013

Abstract

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Journal Article

Kenji Kushida, Kaoru (Kay) Shimizu
Socio-Economic Review, 2013

This paper examines how diversely organized capitalist societies evolve by analyzing the transformation of Japan’s financial system since the 1990s. The banking, securities and insurance, as well as the postal financial institutions changed significantly, but are hardly converging to Anglo-American or ‘liberal market’ models. The authors contend that Japan’s new financial system is best characterized as syncretic, with new, traditional and hybrid forms of practices, organizations and norms coexisting.

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Photo credit: Banner image/ Thom Holme