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The challenges facing foreign correspondents in China are forcing the West to reconfigure its understanding of the country, creating opacity that breeds suspicion and mistrust, says Emily Feng, NPR’s Beijing correspondent and recipient of the 2022 Shorenstein Journalism Award. But China seems to want the appearance of foreign media coverage without getting to the heart of what happens in the country.

The Trans-Pacific Sustainability Dialogue convenes social science researchers and scientists from Stanford University and across the Asia-Pacific region, alongside student leaders, policymakers, and practitioners, to generate new research and policy partnerships to accelerate the implementation of the United Nations-adopted Sustainable Development Goals. The inaugural Dialogue will be held in Seoul, Republic of Korea, on October 27 and 28, 2022.

APARC and CSIS gather experts from academia and the policy world to call attention to the role of the South Korean and U.S. governments in addressing the North Korean human rights crisis and urge the Biden administration to fill in the role of Special Envoy on North Korean Human Rights, a position established by U.S. law.

The Ishibashi Tanzan Memorial Foundation recognizes Tsutsui, the Henri H. and Tomoye Takahashi Professor and Senior Fellow in Japanese Studies at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, for his book 'Human Rights and the State.'

Each year, the Global Affiliates Program hosts at APARC a cohort of qualified personnel nominated by our affiliate members, who send their talent to Stanford as visiting fellows for a year of research and enrichment.

Commentary

The tentative conciliatory steps between nuclear-armed rivals at the LAC are important, but come with riders for India.

Commentary

The Southeast Asian bloc must make it clear that it will not accept the military junta’s sham election.

Commentary

The Southeast Asian bloc must make it clear that it will not accept the military junta’s sham election.

MA in East Asian Studies candidate Kerstin Norris spent the summer assisting APARC and Korea Program Director Gi-Wook Shin with his research on racial tensions in Asia. Looking to pursue a PhD in Sociology, Norris found tremendous value in a collaborative academic environment. We spoke with Norris about her experience as a research assistant and her time working with Dr. Shin.

Political Science major Jerome He ‘24, spent the summer assisting APARC Center Fellow Oriana Skylar Mastro. He leveraged the opportunity to expand his knowledge of Chinese security issues and refine his research acumen. We spoke with He about his experience as a research assistant and his time working for Dr. Mastro.

In the first study to evaluate pay-for-performance implementation at a hospital system in Taiwan, APARC’s Asia Health Policy Program Director Karen Eggleston and co-authors reveal how incentive-based measures to ensure continuity and quality of care resulted in positive health outcomes.

The Center offers a suite of fellowships for Asia researchers to begin fall quarter 2023. These include postdoctoral fellowships on contemporary Japan and the Asia-Pacific region, inaugural postdoctoral fellowships and visiting scholar positions with the newly launched Stanford Next Asia Policy Lab, and fellowships for experts on Southeast Asia.

Providing a focused analysis of the challenges China poses to U.S. interests, Center Fellow Oriana Skylar Mastro offers readers a means to identify and understand the various strategic threats presented by the superpower on the rise.

The country’s brutal coup regime is no candidate for political compromise.

Why Beijing can afford to bide Its time

Why Beijing can afford to bide Its time

Even those countries and international organizations that have not supported the military junta in Myanmar have relied on flawed analysis and conventional diplomatic tools and approaches that do not fit the reality of the crisis in the country, argues Marciel, the Oksenberg-Rohlen Fellow at APARC.

Political maneuvers like Speaker Pelosi's visit to Taiwan only anger Beijing but ultimately do not address the key issue of whether the United States has the military capabilities needed to protect Taiwan, argues Center Fellow Oriana Skylar Mastro.

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