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APARC and Korea Program Director Gi-Wook Shin joined Arirang News to examine geopolitical uncertainty surrounding the Korean Peninsula in 2024, North Korea's intentions, Japan-U.S.-South Korea trilateral cooperation, Seoul-Beijing relations, tensions over Taiwan, and South Korean politics and soft power.

Sponsored by Stanford University’s Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, the annual award recognizes outstanding journalists and journalism organizations for excellence in covering the Asia-Pacific region. News editors, publishers, scholars, and organizations focused on Asia research and analysis are invited to submit nominations for the 2024 award through February 15.

The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in San Francisco, which concluded the 2023 APEC host year for the United States, included a highly-anticipated meeting between U.S. President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping. Shorenstein APARC scholars weigh in on the significance of the meeting in the context of China’s geopolitical ambitions, the outcomes of the APEC summit, and other topics.

The third installment of Shorenstein APARC’s fall seminar series examined energy challenges in the Asia-Pacific region and the role of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation in facilitating collaborative clean energy solutions.

Ahead of the 2023 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) convening in San Francisco, APARC kicked off its fall seminar series, Exploring APEC’s Role in Facilitating Regional Cooperation, with a panel discussion that examined APEC’s role and continued relevance in a rapidly-evolving Asia-Pacific region.

The Trans-Pacific Sustainability Dialogue, a joint initiative by the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center and the Ban Ki-moon Foundation For a Better Future, convened for the second annual meeting in Seoul, South Korea, to generate new research and policy collaborations to advance energy security, the seventh of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals.

The second annual convening of the Trans-Pacific Sustainability Dialogue will gather social science researchers and scientists from Stanford University and across the Asia-Pacific region alongside young leaders, policymakers, and practitioners, to expedite energy security solutions, investment, and policy support. Held in Seoul, Republic of Korea, on September 12-14, 2023, the dialogue features award-winning actor and director Cha In-pyo as honorary ambassador.

The Center offers a suite of fellowships for Asia researchers to begin in fall quarter 2024. These include postdoctoral fellowships on Asia-focused health policy, contemporary Japan, and the Asia-Pacific region, postdoctoral fellowships and visiting scholar positions with the Stanford Next Asia Policy Lab, and fellowships for experts on Southeast Asia.

Housed within the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, the lab will pioneer evidence-based policy research to help Asian nations forge pathways to a future characterized by social, cultural, economic, and political maturity and advance U.S.-Asia dialogue.

We are thrilled to welcome seven outstanding scholars supported through our multiple fellowship offerings, including postdoctoral fellowships on Japan, Korea, and contemporary Asia, the Lee Kong Chian Fellowship on Contemporary Southeast Asia, and APARC's Predoctoral Fellowship and Diversity Grant.

In the fifth installment of a series recognizing the 40th anniversary of Stanford’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, the Korea Program gathered scholars and notable speakers from the Korean film industry, including screenwriter Ji Eun Park and actor Byung Hun Lee. The half-day conference provided an opportunity to consider the future of the Korean wave of popular culture, or hallyu, and its global implications.

Depopulation is a concern shared by Japan and South Korea. Immigration of high-skilled labor could be a solution for mitigating it. In this regard, Japan SPOTLIGHT interviewed Prof. Gi-Wook Shin, who is working on a new research initiative seeking to examine the potential benefits of talent flows in the Asia-Pacific region.

Biden needs South Korean support for U.S. geopolitical efforts, whereas Yoon hopes to resolve contentious domestic issues with support from Biden.

APARC and Korea Program Director Gi-Wook Shin joins Gita Wirjawan, a visiting scholar at the Center and host of the “Endgame” video podcast, to share his work on the ways in which countries in Asia and elsewhere can address brain drain, discuss the influence of soft power on South Korea's evolution, and consider the threats posed by demographic and democratic crises to the country’s future.

Commentary
In this translation of a Korean commentary in "Sindonga," Gi-Wook Shin argues that South Korea must act now to ensure that its climate, energy, and economic policies are ready to face the climate crisis, which is already upon us.

Ambassador Jung-Seung Shin, the Winter 2023 Payne Distinguished Fellow, offered insights into the dynamics of the trilateral U.S.-China-South Korea relationship, the impacts of the great power competition between the United States and China on South Korea, and the prospects for enhanced Korea-U.S. collaboration.

Research by Stanford health economist Karen Eggleston, the director of APARC's Asia Health Policy Program, offers evidence on the link between medical spending and health outcomes in South Korea, showing how the country can benefit from developing a “satellite account for health” to promote high-value innovations for longer, healthier lives.

The time has come to depoliticize North Korean human rights. South Korean progressives have argued that working to improve human rights in North Korea threatens to worsen inter-Korean relations and makes addressing security threats difficult, but the Moon administration failed to make progress in security or relations despite sidelining human rights. The Yoon administration should work on multilateral approaches to address the state of human rights in the North and reach a domestic bipartisan consensus on the issue.

Discover More at the Korea Program