APARC Publications

A collection of books published in Shorenstein APARC in-house monograph series set against the background of Encina Hall entranceway

Shorenstein APARC Publications

Sharing scholarship and insight on pressing Asia-Pacific topics

Our publishing program

We disseminate research and insight by the Shorenstein APARC intellectual community through an active publishing program that includes an array of books, working papers, and policy briefs. In addition, our faculty and researchers publish extensively in peer-reviewed, academic journals and in scholarly and trade presses. They also frequently provide commentary on newsworthy topics affecting Asia and U.S.-Asia relations.

Featured Publications

The book cover of The North Korean Conundrum

Balancing North Korean Human Rights and Nuclear Security

In 'The North Korean Conundrum.' experts examine the relationship between North Korean human rights and denuclearization, and how North Koreans’ limited access to information is part of the crisis.
Book cover showing a robotic hand holding an older human hand.

Exploring the Intersection of Demographics and Innovation in Asia

The new volume 'Demographics and Innovation in the Asia-Pacific' offers lessons from Asian nations about the challenges facing aging societies and the roles technology and innovation may play in rebalancing them.
Cover of the book 'The Deer and the Dragon: Southeast Asia and China in the 21st Century'

Analyzing China-Southeast Asia Relations in the 21st Centurry

In Donald K. Emmerson’s new edited volume, ‘The Deer and the Dragon,’ experts explore how Southeast Asian nations are navigating complex challenges in relation to their powerful and increasingly assertive neighbor.

APARC Monograph Series with Stanford University Press

Jointly with Stanford University Press, the Center produces the series Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, featuring academic research by our faculty and scholars.

APARC In-House Series with the Brookings Institution Press

The Center produces a self-published book series featuring policy-relevant research and analysis by our scholars and affiliates. Titles in this series are distributed by Brookings Institution Press.

Publications

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Andrew G. Walder
Journal Articles

The Party Elite and China's Trajectory of Change

Andrew Walder
China: An International Journal , 2004

China's path of political and economic change has diverged sharply from the experience of virtually all other state socialist regimes. Distinguishing it are its rapidly growing economy and expansion of higher education, deep engagement with the world economy and radical shift towards educational attainment in Party recruitment. These signs of political revitalisation portend a quiet transformation of China's elite, and may reinforce a stable evolution towards effective and less authoritarian forms of government.

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Journal Articles

Elite Opportunity in Transitional Economies

Andrew G. Walder
American Sociological Review , 2003

Command economies gave Communist-era elites administrative control and material privilege but severely restricted money income and private wealth. Markets and privatization inject new value into public assets and create unprecedented opportunities for elite insiders. These opportunities depend on the extent of regime change and barriers to asset appropriation. Regime change varies from the survival of the entire party hierarchy to its rapid collapse and defeat in competitive elections.

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Journal Articles

Cultural Revolution in the Countryside, The: Scope, Timing and Human Impact

Andrew G. Walder, Yang Su
China Quarterly , 2003

Information extracted from 1,520 county annals published after 1987 is used to estimate the timing and impact of the Cultural Revolution in rural China. Outside observers initially concluded that the movement had little impact on remote rural regions, while early post-Mao revelations suggested that the opposite was the case.

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Journal Articles

Income Determination and Market Opportunity in Rural China, 1978-1996

Andrew Walder
Journal of Comparative Economics , 2002

In the second decade of market reform, rural cadre and entrepreneur households enjoy large net income advantages of roughly equal magnitude. Cadre household incomes are primarily from salaries, and they do not decline with increasing levels of rural industrialization. These cross-sectional findings about income determination are reinforced by an event-history analysis of occupational shifts. With large income advantages based on salary income, at no point in market reform have cadres moved into self-employment or private entrepreneurship at higher rates than ordinary farmers.

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Journal Articles

Beijing Red Guard Factionalism: Social Interpretations Reconsidered

Andrew G. Walder
The Journal of Asian Studies , 2002

A generation of research on Red Guard politics has traced the origins of its debilitating factionalism to social and political divisions that were well established among students on the eve of the Cultural Revolution. These social interpretations impute political motives to student activists according to their positions in the pre-Cultural Revolution status quo. However, a closer examination of events during the summer and early autumn of 1966 in BeijingÑwhere the Red Guards and their factional divisions first emergedÑsuggests a different interpretation.

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Journal Articles

Markets and Income Inequality in Rural China: Political Advantage in an Expanding Economy

Andrew Walder
American Sociological Review , 2002

When market reform generates rapid growth in an agrarian subsistence economy, changes in inequality may be due to economic growth and structural change rather than to the intrinsic features of markets. the case of post-Mao China is examined using nationally representative survey data gathered in 1996 to address unresolved questions about findings from 1980s surveys. Well into reform's second decade, political officeholding has a large net impact on household income -- comparable to that of operating a private enterprise.

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Journal Articles

Career Advancement as Party Patronage: Sponsored Mobility into the Chinese Administrative Elite, 1949-1996

Bobai Li, Andrew Walder
American Journal of Sociology , 2001

Core features of mobility regimes are obscured by models common in comparative research. Party patronage in China is apparent only in the timing of career events. Elites are chosen from among party members, but only some are eventually chosen. Those who join the party while young enter a career path that includes sponsorship for adult education and more likely promotion. While the party's preference for youth from "red" classes has yielded to one for prior education, party sponsorship endures.

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Journal Articles

Politics and Life Changes in a State Socialist Regime: Dual Career Paths into the Urban Chinese Elite, 1949 to 1996

Andrew Walder, Bobai Li, Donald J. Treiman
American Sociological Review , 2000

Recent research on career mobility under communism suggests that party membership and education may have had different effects in administrative and professional careers. Using life history data from a nationally representative 1996 survey of urban Chinese adults, we subject this finding to more stringent tests and find even stronger contrasts between career paths. Only recently has college education improved a high school graduate's odds of becoming an elite administrator, while it has always been a virtual prerequisite for a professional position.

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Books

Property Rights and Economic Reform in China

Jean C. Oi, Andrew G. Walder
Stanford University Press , 1999

China's rapid economic growth during the past two decades has occurred without the systematic privatization programs once urged upon the former Communist regimes of Europe and the USSR. Some observers have argued that this shows that changes in property rights are not important in reforming a command economy; others insist that in China a façade of public ownership hides a variety of ownership forms that are essentially private in nature.

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Books

The Evolution of Local State Corporatism

Jean C. Oi, Andrew G. Walder
Harvard University Press in "Zouping in Transition: The Process of Reform in Rural North China" , 1998

Zouping offers important general lessons for the study of China's rural transformation. The authors in this volume, all participants in a unique field research project undertaken from 1988 to 1992, address questions that are far from simple and about which there is some controversy.

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