A collection of books published in Shorenstein APARC in-house monograph series set against the background of Encina Hall entranceway

Shorenstein APARC Publications

Sharing scholarship and insight on pressing Asia-Pacific topics

Our publishing program

We disseminate research and insight by the Shorenstein APARC intellectual community through an active publishing program that includes an array of books, working papers, and policy briefs. In addition, our faculty and researchers publish extensively in peer-reviewed, academic journals and in scholarly and trade presses. They also frequently provide commentary on newsworthy topics affecting Asia and U.S.-Asia relations.

Featured Publications

Cover of the book 'The Deer and the Dragon: Southeast Asia and China in the 21st Century'

Analyzing the Dynamics of Inequality Between China and Southeast Asia

In Donald K. Emmerson’s new edited volume, ‘The Deer and the Dragon,’ experts explore how Southeast Asian nations are navigating complex challenges in relation to their powerful and increasingly assertive neighbor.
Fateful Decisions: Choices That Will Shape China's Future book cover

Understanding the Determinants of China’s Future Trajectories

Analyzing the factors and constraints that shape Chinese actors’ decisions in managing the daunting challenges they now face, a new volume helps decisionmakers interpret and respond to developments in and by China.
Close up on an old woman in a rural area in China

Examining Policies and Economic Research on Healthy Aging in Asia

A new volume by Karen Eggleston examines how Asian economies are preparing for older population age structures and transforming health systems to support patients who will live with chronic disease for decades.

APARC Monograph Series with Stanford University Press

Jointly with Stanford University Press, the Center produces the series Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, featuring academic research by our faculty and scholars.

APARC In-House Series with the Brookings Institution Press

The Center produces a self-published book series featuring policy-relevant research and analysis by our scholars and affiliates. Titles in this series are distributed by Brookings Institution Press.

Publications

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Journal Article

Shorenstein APARC, 2010

The Stanford Korean Studies Program (Stanford KSP) focuses on multidisciplinary, social science-oriented, collaborative research on contemporary Korea. In particular, Stanford KSP promotes interdisciplinary research on policy-relevant topics by using the tools and insights of both area studies and the social sciences. Stanford KSP’s mission is to be a research center in the truest sense, with its own research fellows and collaborative projects. It also seeks close collaboration with similar institutions in Korea and elsewhere.

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Working Paper

Qunhong Shen, Liyang Tang
Asia Health Policy Program working paper #17, 2010

Many Chinese express dissatisfaction with their healthcare system with the popular phrase Kan bing nan, kan bing gui (“medical treatment is difficult to access and expensive”). Critics have cited inefficiencies in delivery and poor quality of services.  Determining the pattern of patient satisfaction with health services in China—and the causes of patient dissatisfaction—may help to improve health care not only in China but in countries in similar predicaments throughout the world.

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Journal Article

Karen Eggleston, Ruifang Zhang, Richard J. Zeckhauser
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2010

The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AR) limits the therapeutic options for treatment of infections, and increases the social benefit from disease prevention. Like an environmental resource, antimicrobials require stewardship. The effectiveness of an antimicrobial agent is a global public good. We argue for greater use of economic analysis as an input to policy discussion about AR, including for understanding the incentives underlying health behaviors that spawn AR, and to supplement other methods of tracing the evolution of AR internationally.

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Book

Rafiq Dossani, Daniel C. Sneider, Vikram Sood
Shorenstein APARC, 2010

Before 1947, South Asia was for the most part a single state. Multiple states emerged thereafter, and then moved apart politically, culturally, and economically. The resulting interstate tensions are manifest in the countless "negative lists"-items that may not be traded, tariffs that must be paid, transport lines that cannot be crossed-that govern these nations' daily interactions. Intermittent armed conflict in the region only intensifies feelings of distrust.

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Book

Masahiko Aoki
Oxford University Press, 2010

The 2008–2009 financial crisis demands we look anew at the role of corporations, and the working of financial markets around the world. In this challenging and insightful book, one of our most eminent economists provides a compelling new analysis of the corporate firm; the role of shareholders, managers and workers; and institutional governance structures.

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Working Paper

Soumitra Ghosh
Asia Health Policy Program working paper #15, 2010

Out-of-pocket payments are the principal source of health care finance in most Asian countries, and India is no exception. This fact has important consequences for household living standards. In this paper the author explores significant changes in the 1990s and early 2000s that appear to have occurred as a result of out-of-pocket spending on health care in 16 Indian states. Using data from the National Sample Survey on consumption expenditure undertaken in 1993–94 and 2004–05, the author  measures catastrophic payments and impoverishment due to out-of-pocket payments for health care.

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Working Paper

Qiong Zhang
Asia Health Policy Program working paper #16, 2010

Many researchers have concluded that longer life expectancies prompt increased investment in education, as a prolonged labor supply raises the rate of return on education. Besides explaining the empirical evidence behind this conclusion (at an absolute level), there is another issue to be discussed: does time spent in studying and working increase proportionally with higher longevity?

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Journal Article

Richard Zeckhauser, Karen Eggleston, John Rizzo, Hai Fang
VoxEU.org, 2010

Understanding the relationship between female employment and fertility is a vital ingredient for effective population policy. This column presents new findings from China based on well over 2000 women between 20 and 52 years old. It finds that non-agricultural jobs for women reduce the number of children per woman by 0.64 and the probability of having more than one child by 54.8%.

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Working Paper

Robert Eberhart
2010

This study explores the effects of cross-sectional and time series differences among Japanese firms selecting one of two extant corporate governance systems. The paper presents evidence that the adoption by Japanese firms of a shareholder-centric, more transparent, system of corporate governance creates greater corporate value in comparison to the traditional system of statutory auditors.

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Policy Brief

Jinxia Wang, Jikun Huang, Scott Rozelle
International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development and the International Food and Agricultural Trade Policy Council, 2010

Although China and the United States are the two largest emitters of greenhouse gases, China’s emissions on a per capita basis are significantly lower than those of the U.S.: in 2005, per capita emissions in China were 5.5 metric tons—much less than the U.S. (23.5 metric tons per capita), and also lower than the world average of 7.03 metric tons. China’s total GHG emissions were 7,234.3 million tons of CO2 equivalent (tCO2e) in 2005, 15.4 percent of which came from the agricultural sector. By comparison, total U.S.

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Working Paper

Hakjoon Kim
Shorenstein APARC, 2010

This paper reviews the history of relations between Korea and the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to early 2008. The paper focuses on the growth and expansion of anti-American sentiment in South Korea-and the social movements to which this sentiment gave rise-after Korea's liberation in August 1945. Its primary argument is that anti-American sentiment and movements in South Korea were a product of the country's domestic politics.

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Policy Brief

Michael H. Armacost, Robert Carlin, Victor Cha, Thomas C. Hubbard, Don Oberdorfer, Charles L. "Jack" Pritchard, Evans J. R. Revere, Gi-Wook Shin, Daniel C. Sneider, David Straub
Shorenstein APARC, 2010

Between 2009 and 2010, major new developments in and around the Korean Peninsula profoundly affected the context of U.S.-South Korean relations. The global economy, led by Northeast Asia, began slowly to recover from the economic recession that followed the U.S. financial crisis. As China’s economy continued its dramatic development, East Asian countries strengthened the architecture of regional cooperation. The international community focused increasingly on multilateral problems such as climate change and environmental issues.

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Journal Article

Karen Eggleston, Mingshan Lu, Congdong Li, Jian Wang, Zhe Yang, Jing Zhang, Hude Quan
BMC Health Services Research, 2010

Background: The literature comparing private not-for-profit, for-profit, and government providers mostly relies on empirical evidence from high-income and established market economies. Studies from developing and transitional economies remain scarce, especially regarding patient case-mix and quality of care in public and private hospitals, even though countries such as China have expanded a mixed-ownership approach to service delivery.

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Working Paper

Donald K. Emmerson
S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies Working Paper #193, 2010

The United States belongs to various organizations and networks that encompass countries on both sides of the Pacific Ocean.  The East Asia Summit (EAS) is not among them.  Should the US try to join?  This paper answers that question with a qualified yes:  Despite formidable difficulties affecting President Obama’s schedule of foreign travel, his administration should try to “ease” the US into the Summit, initially as a guest of the host country.  Eventually, pending a review of the EAS’s prior performance and future prospects, the administration may wish to upgrade that status to membershi

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Book

Yongshun Cai
Stanford University Press, 2010

Although academics have paid much attention to contentious politics in China and elsewhere, research on the outcomes of social protests, both direct and indirect, in non-democracies is still limited. In this new work, Yongshun Cai combines original fieldwork with secondary sources to examine how social protest has become a viable method of resistance in China and, more importantly, why some collective actions succeed while others fail.

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Book

Gi-Wook Shin
Stanford University Press, 2010

One Alliance, Two Lenses examines U.S.-Korea relations in a short but dramatic period (1992-2003) that witnessed the end of the Cold War, South Korea's full democratization, inter-Korean engagement, two nuclear crises, and the start of the U.S. war on terror. These events have led to a new era of challenges and opportunities for U.S.-South Korea (ROK) relations.

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