APARC Publications

A collection of books published in Shorenstein APARC in-house monograph series set against the background of Encina Hall entranceway

Shorenstein APARC Publications

Explore our active publishing program and the academic works of our experts

New Publications

3D mockup cover of the book 'The Logic of Governance in China'

Analyzing the Mechanisms in the Governance of China

Xueguang Zhou's book explains how China's centralized political system maintains governance, producing recognizable policy cycles that are obstacles to professionalism and the rule of law.
3D mockup cover of APARC's volume 'South Korea's Democracy in Crisis'

Examining South Korea's Democratic Decline

In 'South Korea's Democracy in Crisis,' experts from Korea and the US explore how illiberalism, populism, and polarization have eroded Korean democracy and affected Korean society and politics.
Cover of book "Drivers of Innovation"

Fostering Pathways to Innovation in the Asia-Pacific

In 'Drivers of Innovation,' scholars from the US and Asia explore education and finance policies conducive to accelerating entrepreneurship and developing human capital for innovation in Asian nations.

APARC Monograph Series with Stanford University Press

Jointly with Stanford University Press, the Center produces the series Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, featuring academic research by our faculty and scholars.

APARC Books Distributed by Rowman & Littlefield

The Center produces books featuring policy-relevant research and analysis of developing issues by our scholars and affiliates. Titles in this series are distributed by the Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group.

Publications

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Thomas Fingar
Journal Articles

Nancy Bernkopf Tucker: Scholar and Public Servant

Thomas Fingar
International Security Studies Forum, 2022 July 12, 2022
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Journal Articles

2007 Iran Nuclear NIE: More of the Story

Thomas Fingar
Intelligence and National Security, 2021 December 15, 2021
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Commentary

Is America Really Back?

Thomas Fingar
2021 November 6, 2021

A Dialogue between Dr. Thomas Fingar and Senior Colonel Zhou Bo (ret.) on the Current State of China-U.S. Relations

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Book Chapters

The Wisdom and Efficacy of Engagement: Objectives, Assumptions, and Impacts

Thomas Fingar
2021 July 15, 2021

Chapter from Engaging China:Fifty Years of Sino-American Relations, Anne F. Thurston, ed. Columbia University Press

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Books

From Mandate to Blueprint

Thomas Fingar
2021 March 15, 2021

Lessons from Intelligence Reform

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Journal Articles

China’s Challenges: Now It Gets Much Harder

Thomas Fingar, Jean C. Oi
The Washington Quarterly, 2020 March 19, 2020

The easy phases of China’s quest for wealth and power are over. After forty years, every one of a set of favorable conditions has diminished or vanished, and China’s future, neither inevitable nor immutable, will be shaped by the policy choices of party leaders facing at least eleven difficult challenges, including the novel coronavirus. 

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Books

"New Missions, New Challenges, 2005-2008" (chapter in the book Truth to Power)

Thomas Fingar
2019 July 11, 2019

Truth to Power, the first-ever history of the U.S. National Intelligence Council (NIC), is told through the reflections of its eight Chairs in the period from the end of the Cold War until 2017. Co-editors Robert Hutchings and Gregory Treverton add a substantial introduction placing the NIC in its historical context going all the way back to the Board of National Estimates in the 1940s, as well as a concluding chapter that highlights key themes and judgments.

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Journal Articles

Forty Years of Formal—but Not yet Normal—Relations

Thomas Fingar
China International Strategy Review, 2019 May 28, 2019

Ties between individuals and institutions in the United States and the People’s Republic of China have become broader, deeper, and stronger during the four decades since the establishment of formal diplomatic relations in 1979 and the relationship can no longer be described as fragile. However, it also cannot yet be considered a normal relationship, at least not from the perspective of American citizens, companies, and commentators on international affairs. The relationship between the two largest economies and military powers has many asymmetries.

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Books

The Role of Intelligence in Countering Illicit Nuclear-Related Procurement (Book Chapter)

Thomas Fingar, Thomas Fingar
2018 June 1, 2018

Thomas Fingar contributes his expertise in international intelligence, security, and policy to the book Preventing Black Market Trade in Nuclear Technology, edited by Matthew Bunn, Martin B. Malin, William C. Potter, and Leonard S. Spector. Fingar's chapter is, "The Role of Intelligence in Countering Illicit Nuclear-Related Procurement," which outlines the importance of coordinated intelligence strategies in curbing the proliferation of dark market nuclear trading.

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Journal Articles

American Foreign Policy in Transition: From Cold War Consensus to Controversy and Confusion

Thomas Fingar
2018 May 11, 2018

In a new article for Contemporary American Review, Shorenstein APARC Distinguished Fellow Thomas Fingar examines how, twenty-five years after the demise of the Soviet Union, Americans are still struggling to understand and adjust to the costs and consequences of success. Since 1991, diplomats, military professionals, and others showed an inclination towards the same approach to international affairs that brought success in the Cold War. The result was a foreign policy both stable and predictable. Under the Trump administration, however, this no longer appears to be the case.
 

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Books

Office of the Director of National Intelligence: From Pariah and Piñata to Managing Partner

Thomas Fingar
Georgetown University Press, 2017 June 12, 2017

This is a chapter in the second edition of The National Security Enterprise, a book edited by Roger Z. George and Harvey Rishikof that provides practitioners' insights into the operation, missions, and organizational cultures of the principal national security agencies and other institutions that shape the U.S. national security decision-making process.

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Policy Briefs

Analyzing the Structure and Performance of Kim Jong-un's Regime

Thomas Fingar, Kwang-Jin Kim, Hyung-Seog Lee, Yong Suk Lee
Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center and Institute for National Security Strategy, 2017 June 1, 2017

As Kim Jong-un begins his sixth year as leader of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), it is appropriate to shift the focus from his moves to consolidate power to the impact that the organizational and staffing changes made under his leadership have had on the operations and efficacy of the system he leads. Toward that end, Stanford’s Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center and the Republic of Korea’s Institute for National Security Strategy (INSS) have prepared a joint paper utilizing the complementary resources of both institutions.

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Books

Uneasy Partnerships: China’s Engagement with Japan, the Koreas, and Russia in the Era of Reform

Thomas Fingar
Stanford University Press, 2017 April 11, 2017

Uneasy Partnerships presents the analysis and insights of practitioners and scholars who have shaped and examined China's interactions with key Northeast Asian partners. Using the same empirical approach employed in the companion volume, The New Great Game (Stanford University Press, 2016), this new text analyzes the perceptions, priorities, and policies of China and its partners to explain why dyadic relationships evolved as they have during China's "rise."

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Policy Briefs

President Trump's Asia Inbox

Gi-Wook Shin, Michael H. Armacost, Takeo Hoshi, Karl Eikenberry, Thomas Fingar, Kathleen Stephens, Daniel C. Sneider, Donald K. Emmerson
Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2017 February 10, 2017

Scholars at Stanford's Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies assess the strategic situation in East Asia to be unsettled, unstable, and drifting in ways unfavorable for American interests. These developments are worrisome to countries in the region, most of which want the United States to reduce uncertainty about American intentions by taking early and effective steps to clarify and solidify U.S. engagement. In the absence of such steps, they will seek to reduce uncertainty and protect their own interests in ways that reduce U.S.

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Commentary

A Silk Road for the Twenty-First Century?

Thomas Fingar
Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), 2016 November 1, 2016

In an analysis piece for CSIS, Shorenstein APARC Distinguished Fellow Thomas Fingar examines the geopolitical, economic and developmental considerations of Xi Jinping's call for China and the states of Central Asia to build a modern-day "Silk Road."

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Books

The New Great Game: China and South and Central Asia in the Era of Reform

Thomas Fingar
Stanford University Press, 2016 March 9, 2016
China's rise has elicited envy, admiration, and fear among its neighbors. Although much has been written about this, previous coverage portrays events as determined almost entirely by Beijing. Such accounts minimize or ignore the other side of the equation: namely, what individuals, corporate actors, and governments in other countries do to attract, shape, exploit, or deflect Chinese involvement. The New Great Game analyzes and explains how Chinese policies and priorities interact with the goals and actions of other countries in the region.
 
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Commentary

Xi Jinping's Visit to Washington

Thomas Fingar
2015 September 25, 2015

Chinese media will overstate the impact of Xi Jinping’s first state visit to the United States and American commentators will carp about the failure to resolve intractable issues, but the visit scored a number of significant achievements. Cyber-theft is arguably the most important issue on the bilateral agenda. One such notable development was Xi’s clear statement that China is committed to reform and improve the global order from which it has benefitted and to which it has contributed. The two presidents also committed to mitigate malicious cyber activity from their national territory and

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Commentary

动荡世界中的安全挑战:更少敌人、更多挑战和焦虑

Thomas Fingar
Institute of International and Strategic Studies, Peking University, 2015 August 17, 2015

A version of this paper, "Security Challenges in a Turbulent World: Fewer Enemies, More Challenges, and Greater Anxiety," delivered at the International Areas Studies Symposium at the University of Okalhoma, on Feb. 26, 2015, is also available in English by clicking here.

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Books

太平洋戦争終結70周年に考える:8人のスタンフォード研究者による終戦の日の談話

Alberto Díaz-Cayeros, Peter Duus, Thomas Fingar, David Holloway, Takeo Hoshi, Yong Suk Lee, Henry S. Rowen, Daniel C. Sneider
2015 May 15, 2015

8月15日、安倍首相は第2次大戦終結70周年を記念する談話を発表する。戦後50周年(1995年)の村山談話、そして60周年(2005年)の小泉談話に続くものだ。

ショーレンスタイン・アジア太平洋研究センター (APARC) とフリーマン・スポグリ国際研究所 (FSI) に所属する8人の学者が、自分が日本の首相だったら発表するであろう談話を書き上げた。

英語版はこちらをご覧ください。

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Books

Reflections on the Seventieth Anniversary of the End of the Pacific War: Eight Stanford Scholars Write Their Own August Statement

Alberto Díaz-Cayeros, Peter Duus, Thomas Fingar, David Holloway, Takeo Hoshi, Yong Suk Lee, Henry S. Rowen, Daniel C. Sneider
2015 May 15, 2015

On August 15, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will publish a short statement to commemorate the seventieth anniversary of the end of World War II.  This follows similar practices of his predecessors.  Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama started by delivering a short statement on the fiftieth anniversary in 1995.  Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi followed in 2005 with the statement on the sixtieth anniversary.

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Commentary

The United States and China: Same Bed, Different Dreams, Shared Destiny

Thomas Fingar
2015 April 20, 2015

In the third annual Nancy Bernkopf Tucker Memorial Lecture on U.S.-East Asia Relations, Thomas Fingar, Oksenberg-Rohlen Distinguished Fellow in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford, former deputy director of national intelligence for analysis and former chairman of the National Intelligence Council, discusses U.S. policy toward China. The speech titled "The United States and China: Same Bed, Different Dreams, Shared Destiny" was delivered at The Wilson Center in Washington, D.C., on April 20, 2015. Links to English and Chinese versions are listed below.

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Commentary

Security Challenges in a Turbulent World: Fewer Enemies, More Challenges, and Greater Anxiety

Thomas Fingar, Thomas Fingar
Annual IAS Symposium, 2015 February 26, 2015

Speech excerpt:

The conference is designed to illustrate the scope and variety of the security challenges we face and I commend both the organizers and the presenters. I have learned much and am confident you have as well. Others have addressed specific challenges; my assignment is to provide a big picture perspective that will provide context and a framework for understanding the nature of the world we live in and the types of challenges we face.

Toward that end, I will organize my remarks around three interrelated questions:

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Policy Briefs

Korean Unification: An American View

Thomas Fingar
Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2014 December 3, 2014

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) remains a potentially destabilizing element of the Korean Peninsula, making it difficult to construct a regional architecture that could help preserve peace and prosperity. “Korean Reunification: An American View” suggests that transformation of the North Korean regime may be a prerequisite for Korean reunification and a key factor in building a sustainable future in Northeast Asia. The United States, the Republic of Korea, Japan and others must find ways to engage the North, without rewarding misbehavior. Two suggested approaches include pushing for Chinese-style reforms and increasing incentives for the DPRK elite.

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Journal Articles

China's Rise, Japan's Quest, and South Korea-US Co-operation

Thomas Fingar
Global Asia, 2014 October 16, 2014

Perceptions of security risks in Northeast Asia are increasingly being shaped by the rise of China and Japan's more recent efforts to become a more "normal" nation. The momentum behind both developments is being felt acutely in the relationship between the United States and South Korea. While many argue that the stage is being set for an inevitable conflict, Thomas Fingar, the Oksenberg-Rohlen Distinguished Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, argues that what is happening in China and Japan provides an opportunity for greater multilateral cooperation.

 


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