APARC - Korea Publications

Covers of Korea Program books on the backdrop of Encina Hall colonnade, Stanford

Publications

Rigorous analysis of political, economic, social, and foreign policy concerns in the Koreas and U.S.-Korean relations for the academic community, foreign policy experts, and the interested public.

Korea Program faculty and fellows regularly author books, book chapters, working papers, and policy recommendations, and we share the outcomes of our research projects and the proceedings of our conferences, workshops, and policy outreach activities in policy briefs and edited volumes. These are issued through the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center’s publishing program and distributed by Stanford University Press and the Brookings Institution. Our scholars also publish extensively in peer-reviewed academic journals and in scholarly and trade presses. Browse our publications below.

 

Publication Spotlight

In his new book, 'Being in North Korea,' our former Koret Fellow in Korean Studies Andray Abrahamian explores the question "What is it like there?" in an honest and oftentimes amusing way, drawing on his extensive in-country experience.

Publications

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Policy Brief

“New Beginnings” in the U.S.-ROK Alliance: Recommendations to the Obama Administration (October 2011)

Michael H. Armacost, Robert Carlin, Victor Cha, Thomas C. Hubbard, Don Oberdorfer, Charles L. "Jack" Pritchard, Evans J. R. Revere, Gi-Wook Shin, Daniel C. Sneider, David Straub
Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center , 2011

Stanford University’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (Shorenstein APARC) and The Korea Society established the New Beginnings policy study group three years ago to enhance the United States’ important alliance with the Republic of Korea. Differences of approach toward North Korea had created significant tensions between the two governments in preceding years.

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Journal Article

Restitution for Reconciliation: The US, Japan, and the Unpaid Assets of Asian Forced Mobilization Victims

Matthew Augustine
The Journal of Northeast Asian History , 2011

More than six decades after the end of World War II, the Japanese government has yet to return an estimated ¥278 million worth of unpaid financial assets owed to Asian victims of forced mobilization for the war effort. During the Allied Occupation of Japan, American authorities directed Japanese officials to deposit these assets in the Bank of Japan for eventual restitution, setting up a custody account in 1946 and a foreign creditor’s account in 1949. However, the outbreak of the Korean War destroyed any chance of restitution, as the U.S.

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Book

South Korean Social Movements: From Democracy to Civil Society

Gi-Wook Shin, Paul Chang
Routledge , 2011

This book explores the evolution of social movements in South Korea by focusing on how they have become institutionalized and diffused in the democratic period. The contributors explore the transformation of Korean social movements from the democracy campaigns of the 1970s and 1980s to the rise of civil society struggles after 1987. South Korea was ruled by successive authoritarian regimes from 1948 to 1987 when the government decided to re-establish direct presidential elections.

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Journal Article

Ten Years of Korean Studies at Stanford

Shorenstein APARC , 2011

To mark the tenth anniversary of its founding, Stanford's Korean Studies Program published Ten Years of Korean Studies at Stanford, a comprehensive overview of its globally recognized research, publishing, and programmatic activities; information about the wide range of leading scholars, government officials, and professionals involved with this ever-growing, vibrant program; and details about the significant Korea-related academic and library offerings that the program helps to support at Stanford University.

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