APARC_China Program_Publications

China Program Publications

Publications

Rigorous and timely scholarship on political, economic, social, and foreign policy challenges in China and U.S.-China relations for the academic community, foreign policy experts, and the interested public.

China Program faculty and fellows regularly author books, book chapters, and articles that appear in peer-reviewed academic journals and acclaimed scholarly and trade presses. We also share the outcomes of our research projects and the proceedings of our conferences, workshops, and policy outreach activities in monographs and other volumes that are disseminated through the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center’s publishing program jointly with Stanford University Press and the Brookings Institution. Browse our publications below.

 
3D mock cover of the book 'A Decade of Upheaval'

Publication Spotlight

'A Decade of Upheaval,' by Dong Guoqiang and Andrew Walder, chronicles the surprising and dramatic political conflicts of a rural Chinese county over the course of the Cultural Revolution.

Publications

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Journal Articles

China’s Local Government Debt: The Grand Bargain

Jean C. Oi, Adam Y. Liu, Yi Zhang
The China Journal , 2022
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Book Chapters

Nuclear Deterrence and the US-China Strategic Relationship

Oriana Skylar Mastro
2021

From Alliances, Nuclear Weapons and Escalation: Managing Deterrence in the 21st Century, edited by Stephan Frühling and Andrew O’Neil, published 2021 by ANU Press, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.

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Book Chapters

The Wisdom and Efficacy of Engagement: Objectives, Assumptions, and Impacts

Thomas Fingar
2021

Chapter from Engaging China:Fifty Years of Sino-American Relations, Anne F. Thurston, ed. Columbia University Press

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Journal Articles

Filtered Life

Matthew Kohrman
Public Culture , 2021

Air Purification, Gender, and Cigarettes in the People's Republic of China

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Books

A Decade of Upheaval

Dong Guoqiang, Andrew G. Walder
2021

The Cultural Revolution in Rural China

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Testimonies

The Precarious State of Cross-Strait Deterrence

Oriana Skylar Mastro
2021

Statement before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission on “Deterring PRC Aggression Toward Taiwan”

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Journal Articles

The PLA’s Evolving Role in China’s South China Sea Strategy

Oriana Skylar Mastro, Oriana Skylar Mastro
China Leadership Monitor , 2020

During the past eight months of the global COVID pandemic, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has been active in promoting China’s claims in the South China Sea.  This essay evaluates PLA statements, military exercises and operations, and deployment of relevant platforms and weapons in the South China Sea during this period. I leverage Chinese-language sources in addition to my own operational knowledge from over a decade of military experience to provide greater context for these activities.

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Commentary

After COVID-19: Rebooting Business in China

Jennifer Choo, Jean C. Oi, Christopher Thomas, Xue (Xander) Wu
2020

To explore how business leaders and entrepreneurs in China responded to the COVID-19 lockdown and how they’re planning for the future, the China Program conducted a survey in coordination with the Stanford Center at Peking University and Stanford Business School alumni Christopher Thomas and Xue (Xander) Wu.

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Commentary

疫情之后: 企业的重振与美中​经济​关系前景

Jennifer Choo, Jean C. Oi, Christopher Thomas, Xue (Xander) Wu
2020

To explore how business leaders and entrepreneurs in China responded to the COVID-19 lockdown and how they’re planning for the future, the China Program conducted a survey in coordination with the Stanford Center at Peking University and Stanford Business School alumni Christopher Thomas and Xue (Xander) Wu.

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Journal Articles

China’s Challenges: Now It Gets Much Harder

Thomas Fingar, Jean C. Oi
The Washington Quarterly , 2020

The easy phases of China’s quest for wealth and power are over. After forty years, every one of a set of favorable conditions has diminished or vanished, and China’s future, neither inevitable nor immutable, will be shaped by the policy choices of party leaders facing at least eleven difficult challenges, including the novel coronavirus. 

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Books

Agents of Disorder: Inside China's Cultural Revolution

Andrew G. Walder, Andrew G. Walder
2019

By May 1966, just seventeen years after its founding, the People’s Republic of China had become one of the most powerfully centralized states in modern history. But that summer everything changed. Mao Zedong called for students to attack intellectuals and officials who allegedly lacked commitment to revolutionary principles. Rebels responded by toppling local governments across the country, ushering in nearly two years of conflict that in places came close to civil war and resulted in nearly 1.6 million dead.

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Journal Articles

Forty Years of Formal—but Not yet Normal—Relations

Thomas Fingar
China International Strategy Review , 2019

Ties between individuals and institutions in the United States and the People’s Republic of China have become broader, deeper, and stronger during the four decades since the establishment of formal diplomatic relations in 1979 and the relationship can no longer be described as fragile. However, it also cannot yet be considered a normal relationship, at least not from the perspective of American citizens, companies, and commentators on international affairs. The relationship between the two largest economies and military powers has many asymmetries.

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Journal Articles

American Foreign Policy in Transition: From Cold War Consensus to Controversy and Confusion

Thomas Fingar
2018

In a new article for Contemporary American Review, Shorenstein APARC Distinguished Fellow Thomas Fingar examines how, twenty-five years after the demise of the Soviet Union, Americans are still struggling to understand and adjust to the costs and consequences of success. Since 1991, diplomats, military professionals, and others showed an inclination towards the same approach to international affairs that brought success in the Cold War. The result was a foreign policy both stable and predictable. Under the Trump administration, however, this no longer appears to be the case.
 

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Books

Zouping Revisited: Adaptive Governance in a Chinese County

Jean C. Oi, Jean C. Oi, Steven Goldstein
Stanford University Press , 2018

China has undergone dramatic change in its economic institutions in recent years, but surprisingly little change politically. Somehow, the political institutions seem capable of governing a vastly more complex market economy and a rapidly changing labor force. One possible explanation, examined in Zouping Revisited, is that within the old organizational molds there have been subtle but profound changes to the ways these governing bodies actually work.

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Journal Articles

Mortality In Rural China Declined As Health Insurance Coverage Increased, But No Evidence The Two Are Linked

Maigeng Zhou, Shiwei Liu, M. Kate Bundorf, Karen Eggleston, Sen Zhou
Health Affairs , 2017

Health insurance holds the promise of improving population health and survival and protecting people from catastrophic health spending. Yet evidence from lower- and middle-income countries on the impact of health insurance is limited. We investigated whether insurance expansion reduced adult mortality in rural China, taking advantage of differences across Chinese counties in the timing of the introduction of the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS).

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Commentary

Is the War Danger in Korea Real?

Daniel C. Sneider
Dun Jiao Du , 2017

President Donald Trump's ominous threat to unleash “fire and fury” on North Korea succeeded at least in garnering the attention of not only Kim Jong Un but the globe. The vague assertion of readiness to carry out a preventive attack on North Korea, even to use nuclear weapons, roiled stock markets, sent Japanese to look for bomb shelters and prompted alarmed warnings against the use of force from both foes and allies, including South Korean President Moon Jae-in. The piece is available in Chinese, English and Japanese.

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Commentary

The North Korean Missile Test Pushes Xi and Putin Closer

Daniel C. Sneider
Tokyo Business Today , 2017

The most dangerous impact of North Korea’s long-range missile test this past week may not have been the one in the Sea of Japan, felt in Washington, Seoul and Tokyo. It was in Moscow where Chinese leader Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin locked arms in a united front on how to respond to the growing North Korea crisis. The target of this front was not, however, North Korea. It was the United States, who the Sino-Russian axis accused of pursuing a military “buildup” in the region.

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Books

Office of the Director of National Intelligence: From Pariah and Piñata to Managing Partner

Thomas Fingar
Georgetown University Press , 2017

This is a chapter in the second edition of The National Security Enterprise, a book edited by Roger Z. George and Harvey Rishikof that provides practitioners' insights into the operation, missions, and organizational cultures of the principal national security agencies and other institutions that shape the U.S. national security decision-making process.

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Commentary

A real national security budget will keep the peace

Karl Eikenberry
USA Today , 2017

The 2018 federal budget proposed by the White House would shrink critical tools—of diplomacy, development work and peacemaking—that can reduce the civil wars abroad that threaten U.S. interests and global stability. Forthcoming research for the American Academy of Arts and Sciences shows that these tools can be effective and cheaper than the military forces upon which we must rely when those wars flare into immediate threats. The international system for mediating and keeping peace in such conflicts must be strengthened and updated—not abandoned.

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