Indian students building a robot at a workshop of "Organising Indian and World Robot Olympiad," Kolkata 2016.

Education and Development in the Digital Economy

New directions for the next stages of economic progress

An imperative for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

As exponential improvements in new technologies increasingly affect society, we must create educational systems suited for the global knowledge economy. Drawing on a comparative evaluation of educational systems in Asia-Pacific countries including China, India, Japan, and South Korea, a new research project propose new directions critical for the next stages of economic progress.

Research Focus

East Asia's economic growth during the latter half of the twentieth century was fueled by a well-educated population. In Korea, for instance, the educated workforce enabled the country to quickly move up the industrial ladder and catch up to the technology frontiers of advanced economies. Even as many countries in the region have become developed economies, education remains critical to powering the continued development of their societies.

Today, however, the era of rapid digital transformation requires new models of education. Educational systems must change to support new skills—hard and soft, adapt to new models of work and employment, tackle increasing inequality, and train people to work alongside robots. The very nature of education must change and become more innovative, co-creative, and collaborative.

The Education and Development in the Digital Economy research project evaluates the current state of our educational systems and aims to propose new directions critical for the next stages of economic progress. A considerable part of this research examines the Asia-Pacific region, including China, India, Japan, and South Korea.

In a series of papers, Principal Investigator Yong Suk Lee considers how the educational system that allocates students to schools can affect inequality across regions, and the likelihood that students from different socioeconomic backgrounds can access high-quality, tertiary education in South Korea.

Lee also works jointly with collaborators to study university management practices across science and engineering departments and analyze their impact on student learning outcomes in several countries including India and China. This collaborative research also examines how simple interventions can impact creativity among Chinese students. Such assessment will help better understand what factors can improve the quality of science and technology education as well as drive creativity and innovation.

 

Lead Researchers and Collaborators

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Yong Suk Lee

Shorenstein APARC Korea Program Deputy Director
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Yong Suk Lee

Shorenstein APARC Korea Program Deputy Director
SK Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Prashant Loyalka

Center Research Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Prashant Loyalka

Center Research Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Assistant Professor (Research), Graduate School of Education
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Collaborators

Dinsha Mistree, Research Fellow and Lecturer, Program in the Rule of Law, Stanford Law School
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Collaborators

Dinsha Mistree, Research Fellow and Lecturer, Program in the Rule of Law, Stanford Law School
Marily Oppezzo, Instructor, Medicine, Stanford Prevention Research Center

Publications

 

Creativity is in the Mind (with Prashant Loyalka and Marily Oppezzo)
Forthcoming

Assessing the Performance of Science and Engineering Students (with Prashant Loyalka et al)
Forthcoming

University Management and the Performance of Engineering Students (with Prashant Loyalka and Dinsha Mistree)
Forthcoming

School Districting and the Origins of Residential Land Price Inequality
Journal of Housing Economics, 2015

Exams, Districts, and Intergenerational Mobility: Evidence from South Korea
Labour Economics, 2014


Photo credit: Biswarup Ganguly under a Creative Commons license, via Wikimedia Commons.