Commentary July 22, 2020

Don't Take Our Allies for Granted, Even Japan

As political tensions in the Asia-Pacific increase, Kiyoteru Tsutsui, senior fellow and Japan Program director, cautions the United States from taking long-standing economic and military allies like Japan for granted.
Prime Minister Shinzō Abe of Japan and President Donald Trump of the United States walk alongside the White House in Washington D.C.
Prime Minister Shinzō Abe of Japan and President Donald Trump walk alongside the White House in Washington D.C. Getty Images

This op-ed by Kiyoteru Tsutsui was originally published in The Hill.


With the specter of a cold war with China arising, allies in Asia-Pacific are increasingly important for the United States, whether in fighting pandemics, negotiating trade deals, or containing territorial disputes. Japan historically has been one of the most important partners for American interests in the region and a steadfast ally in the post-World War II era. 

For Japan, too, the U.S.-Japan security alliance has been the cornerstone of its foreign policy for decades, and the Japanese public clearly understands that. Reflecting this understanding, every new security decision in Japan, from the relocation of a U.S.-base in Okinawa to the recent cancellation of Aegis Ashore deployment, spurs intense public debates about the future of the U.S.-Japan alliance. (Continue reading the full article at The Hill.)


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