All Shorenstein APARC News Commentary June 10, 2021

Chinese Space Ambition

On the American Foreign Policy Council Space Strategy podcast, Center Fellow Oriana Skylar Mastro discusses how China views space and why the United States must not surrender global leadership in pursuing aspirational and inspirational space goals.
A case holding lunar rock and debris collected from the Moon by China's space program that is part of a display at the National Museum of China is seen on March 2, 2021 in Beijing,
A case holding lunar rock and debris collected from the Moon by China's space program that is part of a display at the National Museum of China is seen on March 2, 2021, in Beijing. China's mission to the Moon marked the first time in 40 years that fresh lunar rock samples were returned to Earth. The unmanned spacecraft, called Chang-e 5, collected roughly 4 pounds of rock and debris from a region of the Moon's surface that had not been previously explored. Kevin Frayer/ Getty Images

Space strategy is central to great-power competition and China believes it needs to excel and compete effectively in space, whether in civilian, commercial, or military usage, says Center Fellow Oriana Skylar Mastro on Space Strategy, a podcast from the American Foreign Policy Council (AFPC). Listen below:

Sign up for APARC newsletters to receive the latest updates from our experts.


Mastro joined podcast host Peter Garretson, Senior Fellow in Defense Studies at AFPC, to examine how China views space and why space is key to any military conflict, particularly across the Taiwan strait.

The U.S. military is far superior to the Chinese, says Mastro, yet one main reason China might prevail in a conflict over Taiwan is that it might achieve its goals before the United States can amass enough forces to respond. “Whether the United States can do this is largely dependent on space."

During this conversation, Mastro discusses China's approach to negotiation, deterrence, diplomacy, and inducements; the potential for misunderstanding and escalation in targeting U.S. space assets; and the considerations that impact U.S.-China space cooperation. She also explains how freedom in space is critical to avoiding foreign dependence and why the United States must build a resilient military space architecture and not surrender global leadership in pursuing aspirational and inspirational space goals.

read more

An Island that lies inside Taiwan's territory is seen with the Chinese city of Xiamen in the background.
Commentary

The Taiwan Temptation

Why Beijing Might Resort to Force
Kurt Campbell and Laura Rosenberger speaking at the 2021 Oksenberg Conference
News

White House Top Asia Policy Officials Discuss U.S. China Strategy at APARC’s Oksenberg Conference

National Security Council’s Coordinator for Indo-Pacific Affairs Kurt Campbell and Senior Director for China and Taiwan Laura Rosenberger describe the shifting U.S. strategic focus on Asia and the Biden administration’s approach to engaging an assertive China.
President Biden and President Suga walk through the Rose Garden colonnade at the White House
Commentary

China Looms Large, Despite a Strong US-Japan Alliance

From Taiwan and the Senkaku Islands to economics, trade, and human rights issues in Xinjiang and Hong Kong, the U.S.-Japan alliance has plenty to tackle with its policies towards China.