Oriana Skylar Mastro Discusses China's Naval Capacity on the BBC World Service

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Chinese People's Liberation Army navy soldiers of a guard of honor look at Chinese President Xi Jinping
Chinese People's Liberation Army navy soldiers of a guard of honor look at Chinese President Xi Jinping.
Photo credit: 
Feng Li/Getty Images

Center Fellow Oriana Skylar Mastro joined BBC World Service's The Real Story host Ritula Shah and a panel of experts to discuss China's naval might and its military modernization program (the interview with Mastro starts at 24:00) 

China has reacted angrily following this month's announcement of an alliance that will enable Australia to possess and deploy nuclear-powered submarines in the region. Australia says the partnership with the USA and the UK, or AUKUS, is not aimed at China. But most analysts agree that the initiative is hoping to counter Beijing's rapidly expanding naval capabilities. Chinese patrol boats have clashed with neighboring vessels in disputed waters, home to billions of barrels of untapped oil and gas. The country has created artificial islands in the South China Sea and there are concerns it may use its growing amphibious capabilities to invade Taiwan. So how important is the Chinese navy to the country's overall strategic and economic plan? How does its expansion affect maritime disputes in East Asia and the safe passage of trillions of dollars worth of commodities each year? And is China right to accuse the West of a 'Cold War mentality' when it criticizes the country's military investments? is joined by a panel of experts.

Dig deeper: learn about Mastro's research project, Deterrence and Defense across the Taiwan Strait.