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Karen Eggleston, PhD

  • Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
  • Center Fellow at the Center for Health Policy and the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research
  • Faculty Research Fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research
  • Director of the Asia Health Policy Program, Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center
  • Stanford Health Policy Associate
  • Faculty Fellow at the Stanford Center at Peking University, June and August of 2016
  • Stanford Affiliate, Stanford Center on China's Economy and Institutions

Shorenstein APARC
Stanford University
Encina Hall E301
Stanford, CA 94305-6055

(650) 723-9072 (voice)
(650) 723-6530 (fax)

Biography

Karen Eggleston is Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University and Director of the Stanford Asia Health Policy Program at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center at FSI. She is also a Fellow with the Center for Innovation in Global Health at Stanford University School of Medicine, and a Faculty Research Fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Eggleston earned her PhD in public policy from Harvard University and has MA degrees in economics and Asian studies from the University of Hawaii and a BA in Asian studies summa cum laude (valedictorian) from Dartmouth College. Eggleston studied in China for two years and was a Fulbright scholar in Korea. Her research focuses on government and market roles in the health sector and Asia health policy, especially in China, India, Japan, and Korea; healthcare productivity; and the economics of the demographic transition. She served on the Strategic Technical Advisory Committee for the Asia Pacific Observatory on Health Systems and Policies, and has been a consultant to the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and the WHO regarding health system reforms in the PRC.

publications

Journal Articles
January 2023

Family Physician Services and Blood Pressure Control in China

Author(s)
Family Physician Services and Blood Pressure Control in China
Journal Articles
January 2023

Potential Health and Economic Impact Associated With Achieving Risk Factor Control in Chinese Adults With Diabetes

Author(s)
Potential Health and Economic Impact Associated With Achieving Risk Factor Control in Chinese Adults With Diabetes
Journal Articles
September 2022

Association Between the Quality of Primary Care, Insurance Coverage, and Diabetes-Related Health Outcomes in a Cohort of Older Adults in China

Author(s)
Association Between the Quality of Primary Care, Insurance Coverage, and Diabetes-Related Health Outcomes in a Cohort of Older Adults in China

Current research

In The News

china healthcare money
News

New Study Shows Health and Economic Benefits of Controlling Diabetes Risk Factors in Chinese Adults

Using recent data from the China Chronic Disease and Nutrition Surveillance survey and applying the Chinese Hong Kong Integrated Modelling and Evaluation microsimulation model, a new study co-authored by APARC's Karen Eggleston found that substantial health improvements and medical savings could be achieved in China by better control of glycemia and blood pressure, two modifiable risk factors for diabetes.
New Study Shows Health and Economic Benefits of Controlling Diabetes Risk Factors in Chinese Adults
Doctor and nurse working on computer together. Female medical professionals are wearing uniforms. They are standing in hospital corridor.
News

Incentivizing Quality of Care: New Study Shows Positive Outcomes in Taiwan’s Pay-for-Performance Diabetes Care Program

In the first study to evaluate pay-for-performance implementation at a hospital system in Taiwan, APARC’s Asia Health Policy Program Director Karen Eggleston and co-authors reveal how incentive-based measures to ensure continuity and quality of care resulted in positive health outcomes.
Incentivizing Quality of Care: New Study Shows Positive Outcomes in Taiwan’s Pay-for-Performance Diabetes Care Program
A trio of elderly women in Japan
News

Japanese Population Projected to Live Longer Without Dementia

A new microsimulation projects that over the next 20 years, Japanese people will live longer without dementia, but older women with a less than high school education will benefit less than men.
Japanese Population Projected to Live Longer Without Dementia

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