Governance

Governance

FSI's research on the origins, character and consequences of government institutions spans continents and academic disciplines. The institute’s senior fellows and their colleagues across Stanford examine the principles of public administration and implementation. Their work focuses on how maternal health care is delivered in rural China, how public action can create wealth and eliminate poverty, and why U.S. immigration reform keeps stalling. 

FSI’s work includes comparative studies of how institutions help resolve policy and societal issues. Scholars aim to clearly define and make sense of the rule of law, examining how it is invoked and applied around the world. 

FSI researchers also investigate government services – trying to understand and measure how they work, whom they serve and how good they are. They assess energy services aimed at helping the poorest people around the world and explore public opinion on torture policies. The Children in Crisis project addresses how child health interventions interact with political reform. Specific research on governance, organizations and security capitalizes on FSI's longstanding interests and looks at how governance and organizational issues affect a nation’s ability to address security and international cooperation.

Recent Scholarly Publications

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Political Change in Taiwan: Implications for American Policy

October 2000

Transcript of an address given by Richard Bush, chairman of the board and managing director of the American Institute in Taiwan, on May 24, 2000.

The Quality of Democracy in South Korea and Taiwan: Subjective Assessments from the Perspectives of Ordinary Citizens

December 2003

South Korea (Korea hereafter) and Taiwan are widely recognized as the two most successful third-wave democracies in Asia (Chu, Diamond, and Shin, 2001; Diamond and Plattner, 1998; Shin and Lee,...

Elections and Democracy in Greater China

December 2001

The authoritarian Chinese regimes governing Taiwan, Mainland China, and Hong Kong allowed limited electoral competition during the last half century.

Anatomy of an Earthquake: How the KMT Lost and the DPP Won the 2000 Presidential Election

November 2001

The March 2000 presidential election was an important milestone in the democratic development of Taiwan, with the Kuomintang turned out of power after five decades of control and replaced by the...

How People View Democracy: Halting Progress in Korea and Taiwan

January 2001

Judging from their citizens middling levels of support for and satisfaction with democracy, both Korea and Taiwan are still far from democratic consolidation.

Consolidating the Third Wave Democracies

December 1997

The global trend that Samuel P. Huntington has dubbed the "third wave" of democratization has seen more than 60 countries experience democratic transitions since 1974.

Political Change in China: Comparisons with Taiwan

June 2008

How might China become a democracy? And what lessons, if any, might Taiwan's experience of democratization hold for China's future?

History Textbooks and the Wars in Asia: Divided Memories

December 2011

Over the past fifteen years Northeast Asia has witnessed growing intraregional exchanges and interactions, especially in the realms of culture and economy.

New Challenges for Maturing Democracies in Korea and Taiwan

January 2014

New Challenges for Maturing Democracies in Korea and Taiwan takes a creative and comparative view of the new challenges and dynamics confronting these maturing democracies.

Taiwan's Democracy Challenged: The Chen Shui-bian Years

December 2015

At the end of Chen Shui-bian’s two terms as the president of Taiwan, his tenure was widely viewed as a disappointment, if not an outright failure.

Threats, Alliances, and Electorates: Why Taiwan's Defense Spending Has Fallen as China's Has Risen

November 2015

 Over the past 20 years, the military balance between the People’s Republic of China and Taiwan has rapidly shifted.

The Aborigine Constituencies in the Taiwanese Legislature

November 2015

The Republic of China on Taiwan has long reserved legislative seats for its indigenous minority, the yuanzhumin.