APARC Publications

A collection of books published in Shorenstein APARC in-house monograph series set against the background of Encina Hall entranceway

Shorenstein APARC Publications

Sharing scholarship and insight on pressing Asia-Pacific topics

Our publishing program

We disseminate research and insight by the Shorenstein APARC intellectual community through an active publishing program that includes an array of books, working papers, and policy briefs. In addition, our faculty and researchers publish extensively in peer-reviewed, academic journals and in scholarly and trade presses. They also frequently provide commentary on newsworthy topics affecting Asia and U.S.-Asia relations.

Featured Publications

The book cover of The North Korean Conundrum

Balancing North Korean Human Rights and Nuclear Security

In 'The North Korean Conundrum.' experts examine the relationship between North Korean human rights and denuclearization, and how North Koreans’ limited access to information is part of the crisis.
Book cover showing a robotic hand holding an older human hand.

Exploring the Intersection of Demographics and Innovation in Asia

The new volume 'Demographics and Innovation in the Asia-Pacific' offers lessons from Asian nations about the challenges facing aging societies and the roles technology and innovation may play in rebalancing them.
Cover of the book 'The Deer and the Dragon: Southeast Asia and China in the 21st Century'

Analyzing China-Southeast Asia Relations in the 21st Centurry

In Donald K. Emmerson’s new edited volume, ‘The Deer and the Dragon,’ experts explore how Southeast Asian nations are navigating complex challenges in relation to their powerful and increasingly assertive neighbor.

APARC Monograph Series with Stanford University Press

Jointly with Stanford University Press, the Center produces the series Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, featuring academic research by our faculty and scholars.

APARC In-House Series with the Brookings Institution Press

The Center produces a self-published book series featuring policy-relevant research and analysis by our scholars and affiliates. Titles in this series are distributed by Brookings Institution Press.

Publications

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Xueguang Zhou
Journal Articles

Will Demographic Change Slow China's Rise?

Karen Eggleston, Jean C. Oi, Scott Rozelle, Andrew G. Walder, Xueguang Zhou, Ang Sun
The Journal of Asian Studies , 2013

China's population of 1.34 billion is now 50 percent urban, over 13 percent above age 60, and with 118 boys born for every 100 girls. For such a large population at a relatively low level of per capita income, how will aging interact with substantial gender imbalance and rapid urbanization?

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Journal Articles

Children of China's Future

Karen Eggleston, Jean C. Oi, Scott Rozelle, Ang Sun, Xueguang Zhou
YaleGlobal Online , 2012

As China's economy grows so does the prevalence of social inequality. In a YaleGlobal Online article, a team of Shorenstein APARC China experts says the country must invest more now in education and public health programs for its rural children or it will face major growth challenges in the near future.

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Journal Articles

The Autumn Harvest: Peasants and Markets in Post-Collective Rural China

Xueguang Zhou
The China Quarterly , 2011

For the peasants in rural China, the harvest season is the occasion when several different worlds—the business world of large companies, the entrepreneurial world of middlemen, local elites and peasant households—are compressed into the same social space, thereby inducing intensive economic and social interactions and crystallizing social relations among villagers, local elites and markets.

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Working Papers

Modes of Governance in the Chinese Bureaucracy: A “Control Rights” Theory

Xueguang Zhou, Hong Lian
2011

Drawing on insights from recent economic theories of incomplete contracts and property rights, we develop a theoretical model on authority relationships in the Chinese bureaucracy by conceptualizing the allocation of control rights in goal setting, inspection and incentive provision among the principal, supervisor and agent. Variations in the allocation of control rights give rise to different modes of governance and entail distinct behavioral implications among the parties involved.

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Journal Articles

Rethinking Property Rights as a Relational Concept: Access to Financial Resources Among Small and Mid-Sized Firms

Xueguang Zhou, Lulu Li
Chinese Sociological Review , 2011

The prevailing image in the economic and legal literature portrays property rights as “a bundle of rights” and emphasizes their exclusivity, autonomy, and stability. Building on Zhou (2005), the authors elaborate and illustrate an alternative theoretical model to conceptualize property rights as a relational concept. They argue that the formation and evolution of property rights reflect ongoing social relations between an organization and its key stakeholders within and outside its boundaries.

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Journal Articles

The Road to Collective Debt in Rural China: Bureaucracies, Social Institutions, and Public Goods Provision

Xueguang Zhou
Modern China , 2011

Focusing on the episodes of the government’s Paved Road to Every Village (PREV) project in an agricultural township in northern China, this article examines two research issues: First, the role of state policies, government bureaucracies, and village cadres in the provision of public goods, especially the unintended consequences that led to huge collective debts and the erosion of the collective basis of governance and second, the role of local institutions and social relations in resource mobilization, problem solving, and response to crises, especially in the aftermath of the PREV project

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Books

Growing Pains: Tensions and Opportunity in China's Transformation

Jean C. Oi, Scott Rozelle, Xueguang Zhou
Shorenstein APARC , 2010

China is transforming itself, and the world is adapting in response. Profound forces have reshaped the country's socioeconomic and political landscapes, but they have also brought challenges—growing pains—that China must face if it is to continue its upward trajectory.

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