APARC Publications

A collection of books published in Shorenstein APARC in-house monograph series set against the background of Encina Hall entranceway

Shorenstein APARC Publications

Explore our active publishing program and the academic works of our experts

New Publications

3D mockup cover of APARC's volume 'South Korea's Democracy in Crisis'

Examining South Korea's Democratic Decline

In 'South Korea's Democracy in Crisis,' experts from Korea and the US explore how illiberalism, populism, and polarization have eroded Korean democracy and affected Korean society and politics.
Cover of book "Drivers of Innovation"

Fostering Pathways to Innovation in the Asia-Pacific

In 'Drivers of Innovation,' scholars from the US and Asia explore education and finance policies conducive to accelerating entrepreneurship and developing human capital for innovation in Asian nations.
3D mockup of the cover of the volume "The Courteous Power'

Analyzing Japan-Southeast Asia Relations in the Indo-Pacific Era

In Kiyoteru Tsutsui's and John D. Ciorciari's 'The Courteous Power,' experts offer fresh perspectives on Japan's relationships with Southeast Asian nations and the balance in the Indo-Pacific region.

APARC Monograph Series with Stanford University Press

Jointly with Stanford University Press, the Center produces the series Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, featuring academic research by our faculty and scholars.

APARC Books Distributed by Rowman & Littlefield

The Center produces books featuring policy-relevant research and analysis of developing issues by our scholars and affiliates. Titles in this series are distributed by the Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group.

Publications

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Gi-Wook Shin
Books

Asia's Middle Powers? The Identity and Regional Policy of South Korea and Vietnam

Joon-woo Park, Gi-Wook Shin, Don Keyser
Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2013 December 31, 2013

South Korea and Vietnam established diplomatic relations only twenty years ago. Today these former adversaries enjoy unexpectedly cordial and rapidly expanding bilateral ties. Leaders of the two nations—perceiving broadly shared interests and no fundamental conflicts—seek to leverage their subregional influence on behalf of common or complementary policy goals. Today they often profess a “middle power” identity as they explain their foreign policy in terms of such classical middle power goals as regional peace, integration, and common goods.

Broadly similar in many respects, South Korea and Vietnam are nonetheless sufficiently different that a comparison can yield interesting insights—yet there is a dearth of systematic comparative work on the two. While holding a range of views on the contentious concepts of middle power and national identity, the contributors to Asia’s Middle Powers? help readers, both academic and policy practitioners, to gain an enhanced appreciation of South Korea and Vietnam’s regional behavior and international strategies

The publication of Asia's Middle Powers was made possible by the generosity of the Koret Foundation of San Francisco, CA.

Examination copies: Shorenstein APARC books are distributed by the Brookings Institution Press. You can obtain information on obtaining an examination copy at their website.

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Policy Briefs

The North Korea Problem and the Necessity for South Korean Leadership

Gi-Wook Shin, Karl Eikenberry, Thomas Fingar, Daniel C. Sneider, David Straub
Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2013 March 4, 2013

This report by scholars and policy experts at Stanford University’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center is based in part on (1) their research for a Yonhap News Agency-sponsored symposium on Northeast Asia security in Seoul in early February, when they also held meetings with then-President Lee Myung-bak and President-elect Park Geun-hye and her chief foreign policy advisers, as well as with leading South Korean progressive intellectuals; and (2) a workshop on North Korea policy at Stanford University on February 14–15, supported by the Koret Foundation of San Francisco, which included top current and former U.S., South Korean, and UN officials and leading academic experts on the Korea problem.

The publication of "The North Korea Problem" was made possible by the generosity of the Koret Foundation of San Francisco, CA.

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Working Papers

South Korea and the Global Economy in Transition

Gi-Wook Shin, Byongwon Bahk, Taeho Bark, Thomas F. Cargill, Joon Nak Choi, Eun Mee Kim, Ji Hyun Kim
Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2012 December 31, 2012

These working papers on the South Korean economy are the product of an annual conference series on Korean affairs hosted by Stanford University's Korean Studies Program (KSP), and made possible by the generous support of the Koret Foundation. KSP's 2009–2010 Koret Fellow, Byongwon Bahk, a former vice finance minister and chief economic adviser to Korean president Lee Myung-bak, played a leading role in organizing the 2010 conference, authored a major paper, and co-edited this volume.

From Byongwon Bahk's preface:

The editors believe that the study of the South Korean economy holds, or should hold, interest not only for Koreans but also for Americans and the international community as a whole. Korea has become a major player in the global economy, ranking thirteenth in GDP and seventh in exports among the world's nearly 200 countries. This should no longer come as much of a surprise to consumers across the globe who use Korean cell phones, drive Korean cars, and, increasingly, enjoy Korean pop music and movies.

The Korean economy is also important as a leading model of development. In only two generations and despite national division and the devastation of civil war, South Korea has transformed itself from a largely agricultural economy to a world leader in manufacturing, which in turn facilitated its emergence as a dynamic democracy. The Korean experience holds many lessons for countries throughout the world as they also struggle to modernize in a highly competitive, globalized economy.

Korea's success in navigating the turmoil caused by the global financial crisis and recession of 2008–2009 is yet another reason for studying its economy. Despite its economy being an astounding 85 percent dependent on international trade, Korea has been among the world's leaders in recovering from the crisis. Korea owes that success in part to the very hard lessons it learned from the Asian financial crisis of 1997–1998.

The five chapters selected for this compendium focus on some of the timeliest and most important issues involving the Korean economy.

Papers included in this volume:

  1. "The Changing Global and Korean Economies" by Taeho Bark
  2. "An Odyssey of the Korean Financial System and the September 2008 Financial Shock" by Thomas F. Cargill
  3. "South Korea’s Official Development Assistance Policy Under Lee Myung-bak: Humanitarian or National Interest?" by Eun Mee Kim and Ji Hyun Kim
  4. "Policy Recommendations for the Korean Economy" by Byongwon Bahk
  5. "Economic Globalization and Expatriate Labor in Korea" by Gi-Wook Shin and Joon Nak Choi
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Journal Articles

The Election That Could Reorder South Korea’s Politics

Gi-Wook Shin
Current History, 2012 September 1, 2012

This year is one of elections and leadership changes throughout the Asia-Pacific region.
Earlier in 2012, Taiwan reelected President Ma Ying-jeou to a second term. North Korea and
Russia have already seen transfers of power this year; it will be China’s turn in the fall. The United States holds its presidential election in November. And South Korea will elect a president in December. Individually and collectively, these leadership changes hold crucial implications for Northeast Asian nations as well as the United States.

In this article, Gi-Wook Shin explores the possible implications of South Korea's upcoming presidential election.

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Books

U.S.-DPRK Educational Exchanges: Assessment and Future Strategy

Gi-Wook Shin, Karin J. Lee
Shorenstein APARC, 2011 December 31, 2011

Although there are no formal diplomatic relations between the United States and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), nonetheless there have been constant attempts by U.S. academia, friendship organizations, and NGOs to develop and promote educational interaction and exchanges between the citizens of these two countries. Have these attempts found success? What lessons can be learned from these experiences?

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Books

History Textbooks and the Wars in Asia: Divided Memories

Gi-Wook Shin, Daniel C. Sneider
Routledge, 2011 December 31, 2011

Over the past fifteen years Northeast Asia has witnessed growing intraregional exchanges and interactions, especially in the realms of culture and economy. Still, the region cannot escape from the burden of history.

This book examines the formation of historical memory in four Northeast Asian societies (China, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan) and the United States focusing on the period from the beginning of the Sino-Japanese war in 1931 until the formal conclusion of the Pacific War with the San Francisco Peace Treaty of 1951.

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Books

Beyond North Korea: Future Challenges to South Korea's Security

Byung Kwan Kim, Gi-Wook Shin, David Straub
Shorenstein APARC, distributed by the Brookings Institution Press, 2011 December 31, 2011

Why should Americans worry about South Korean security? The answer is clear: North Korea, and beyond. Most international attention to the North Korea problem has focused on U.S. policy, but South Korea's longterm role may in fact be more important. South Korea's security is vital to peace and stability, not only in Northeast Asia but also the wider world.

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Journal Articles

Anti-American and Anti-Alliance Sentiments in South Korea

Gi-Wook Shin, Hilary Izatt
Asian Survey, 2011 November 1, 2011

The strain between the United States and the Republic of Korea is often seen as a result of South Korea's anti-Americanism. However, alliance strain and anti-Americanism have not necessarily changed together. This conceptual disparity calls for the need to specify, rather than assume, causality. The authors utilize newly collected data from two major Korean dailies to show this need.

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Policy Briefs

“New Beginnings” in the U.S.-ROK Alliance: Recommendations to the Obama Administration (October 2011)

Michael H. Armacost, Robert Carlin, Victor Cha, Thomas C. Hubbard, Don Oberdorfer, Charles L. "Jack" Pritchard, Evans J. R. Revere, Gi-Wook Shin, Daniel C. Sneider, David Straub
Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2011 October 11, 2011

Stanford University’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (Shorenstein APARC) and The Korea Society established the New Beginnings policy study group three years ago to enhance the United States’ important alliance with the Republic of Korea. Differences of approach toward North Korea had created significant tensions between the two governments in preceding years.

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Books

South Korean Social Movements: From Democracy to Civil Society

Gi-Wook Shin, Paul Chang
Routledge, 2011 May 1, 2011

This book explores the evolution of social movements in South Korea by focusing on how they have become institutionalized and diffused in the democratic period. The contributors explore the transformation of Korean social movements from the democracy campaigns of the 1970s and 1980s to the rise of civil society struggles after 1987. South Korea was ruled by successive authoritarian regimes from 1948 to 1987 when the government decided to re-establish direct presidential elections.

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Books

Values and History in U.S.-South Korean Relations

Gi-Wook Shin, Gibert Rozman
Cambridge University Press in "Issues of History, Values, Memory, and Identity in the U.S.-South Korea Relationship", 2010 October 1, 2010

". . . History, values, memory, and identity are significant elements that can influence the 'soft power' of an alliance built on 'hard power,' and policy makers of both nations should not overlook their importance," says Gi-Wook Shin, director of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center and the Stanford Korean Studies Program, in the chapter that he contributed to the recently published book U.S. Leadership, History, and Bilateral Relations in Northeast Asia.

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Commentary

U.S. role crucial in Northeast Asian reconciliation

Gi-Wook Shin
Korea Times, 2010 September 14, 2010
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Policy Briefs

''New Beginnings'' in the U.S.-ROK Alliance: Recommendations to the Obama Administration (released in 2010)

Michael H. Armacost, Robert Carlin, Victor Cha, Thomas C. Hubbard, Don Oberdorfer, Charles L. "Jack" Pritchard, Evans J. R. Revere, Gi-Wook Shin, Daniel C. Sneider, David Straub
Shorenstein APARC, 2010 May 1, 2010

Between 2009 and 2010, major new developments in and around the Korean Peninsula profoundly affected the context of U.S.-South Korean relations. The global economy, led by Northeast Asia, began slowly to recover from the economic recession that followed the U.S. financial crisis. As China’s economy continued its dramatic development, East Asian countries strengthened the architecture of regional cooperation. The international community focused increasingly on multilateral problems such as climate change and environmental issues.

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Books

One Alliance, Two Lenses: U.S.-Korea Relations in a New Era

Gi-Wook Shin
Stanford University Press, 2010 January 1, 2010

One Alliance, Two Lenses examines U.S.-Korea relations in a short but dramatic period (1992-2003) that witnessed the end of the Cold War, South Korea's full democratization, inter-Korean engagement, two nuclear crises, and the start of the U.S. war on terror. These events have led to a new era of challenges and opportunities for U.S.-South Korea (ROK) relations.

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Journal Articles

North Korea and Contending South Korean Identities: Analysis of the South Korean Media; Policy Implications for the United States

Gi-Wook Shin, Kristin C. Burke
Korea Economic Institute of America, Academic Paper Series On Korea, 2009 December 31, 2009

After North Korea’s nuclear test on 9 October 2006, the fate of South Korea’s engagement policy with North Korea seemed to hang in the balance. To many, the nuclear test stood as a clear indictment of the Sunshine Policy and its successor, President Roh Moo-hyun’s Peace and Prosperity Policy. After years of investment and aid to the North under these policies, South Korea appeared to have received little in return.

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Books

First Drafts of Korea: The U.S. Media and Perceptions of the Last Cold War Frontier

Donald Macintyre, Daniel C. Sneider, Gi-Wook Shin
Shorenstein APARC, distributed by Brookings Institution Press, 2009 August 1, 2009

Few regions rival the Korean Peninsula in strategic importance to U.S. foreign policy. For half a century, America has stationed tens of thousands of troops in South Korea to defend its ally from the threat of North Korean aggression. South Korea, in turn, is critical to the defense of Japan, another ally and the linchpin of American interests in East Asia. The rise of a nuclear-armed North has upped the ante.

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Policy Briefs

''New Beginnings'' in the U.S.-ROK Alliance: Recommendations to the Obama Administration

Michael H. Armacost, Thomas C. Hubbard, Evans J. R. Revere, Gi-Wook Shin, Charles ''Jack'' L. Pritchard, Don Oberdorfer, David Straub, Daniel C. Sneider, Robert Carlin, Victor Cha
Shorenstein APARC, 2009 March 31, 2009

In these uncertain times, the new Obama administration has an important opportunity to transform our vitally important alliance with the Republic of Korea (ROK, or South Korea) into a broader and deeper regional and even global partnership. South Korean President Lee Myung- bak is committed to the concept, and he has four more years in office to work with President Obama on it. The South Korean public also feels considerable goodwill toward President Obama.

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Books

Journal of Korean Studies, volume 13

Gi-Wook Shin, John Duncan
Rowman & Littlefield, 2008 October 1, 2008

Between 1979 and 1992, the Journal of Korean Studies became a leading academic forum for the publication of innovative in-depth research on Korea. Now under the editorial guidance of Gi-Wook Shin and John Duncan, this journal continues to be dedicated to quality articles, in all disciplines, on a broad range of topics concerning Korea, both historical and contemporary.

This edition's contents are as follows:

Articles

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Journal Articles

North Korea and Identity Politics in South Korea

Gi-Wook Shin, Kristin C. Burke
Brown Journal of World Affairs, 2008 October 1, 2008

At his inauguration, South Korean President Lee Myung Bak proclaimed that his country “must move from the age of ideology into the age of pragmatism.” At a time when South Korean voters were fatigued by outgoing President Roh’s particular brand of politics heavily steeped in ideology, Lee’s image as an effective, non-deological manager had proved appealing.

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Working Papers

Divided Memories and Reconciliation: A Progress Report

Daniel Sneider, Gi-Wook Shin, Peter Duus
Shorenstein APARC, 2008 September 1, 2008

In February 2008, an international conference was convened at Stanford University at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center to examine the role of high school history textbooks in the formation of historical memory regarding the events of the Sino-Japanese and Pacific wars and their outcome. “Divided Memories: History Textbooks and the War in Asia,” as the conference was titled, was a remarkable gathering of historians and textbook writers, along with other scholars, from China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and the United States.

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Policy Briefs

“New Beginnings” in the U.S.-ROK Alliance: Recommendations to U.S. Policymakers

Michael H. Armacost, Stephen W. Bosworth, Robert Carlin, Victor Cha, Thomas C. Hubbard, Don Oberdorfer, Charles L. “Jack” Pritchard, Evans J. R. Revere, Gi-Wook Shin, Daniel Sneider, David Straub
Shorenstein APARC, 2008 April 1, 2008

With the inauguration in February 2008 of South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, The Korea Society and Stanford University’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center launched a nonpartisan group of former senior U.S. government officials, scholars, and other American experts on Korea to explore how to revitalize the U.S. alliance with the Republic of Korea (ROK) after nearly a decade of strains and tensions.

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Policy Briefs

South Korea's Democracy Movement (1970-1993): Stanford Korea Democracy Project Report

Gi-Wook Shin, Paul Y. Chang, Jung-eun Lee, Sookyung Kim
2007 December 1, 2007

In this report we present research findings from the Stanford Korea Democra

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Books

Journal of Korean Studies, volume 12

Gi-Wook Shin, John Duncan
Rowman & Littlefield, 2007 October 1, 2007

Between 1979 and 1992, the Journal of Korean Studies became a leading academic forum for the publication of innovative in-depth research on Korea. Now under the editorial guidance of Gi-Wook Shin and John Duncan, this journal continues to be dedicated to quality articles, in all disciplines, on a broad range of topics concerning Korea, both historical and contemporary.

This edition's contents are as follows:

Special section: North Korea:

Guest Editor: Jae-Jung Suh

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Books

Cross Currents: Regionalism and Nationalism in Northeast Asia

Paul Evans, David Kang, Tomoyuki Kojima, Min Gyo Koo, Su Hoon Lee, Makio Miyagawa, Mark Peattie, Randall Schriver, Yinhong Shi, Scott Snyder, Feng Zhu, Gi-Wook Shin, Daniel C. Sneider, Vinod K. Aggarwal, Michael H. Armacost, Paul Evans, David Kang, Tomoyuki Kojima, Min Gyo Koo, Su Hoon Lee, Makio Miyagawa, Mark Peattie, Randall Schriver, Yinhong Shi, Scott Snyder, Feng Zhu
Shorenstein APARC, distributed by Brookings Institution Press, 2007 October 1, 2007

Northeast Asia stands at a turning point in its history. The key economies of China, Japan, and South Korea are growing increasingly interdependent, and the movement toward regionalism is gaining momentum. Yet interdependency, often set in a global context, also spurs nationalism in all three countries, and beyond in East Asia. The essays in this volume assess current interactions -- or cross currents -- between national and regional forces in Northeast Asia, and suggest their future direction.

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