APARC Publications

A collection of books published in Shorenstein APARC in-house monograph series set against the background of Encina Hall entranceway

Shorenstein APARC Publications

Sharing scholarship and insight on pressing Asia-Pacific topics

Our publishing program

We disseminate research and insight by the Shorenstein APARC intellectual community through an active publishing program that includes an array of books, working papers, and policy briefs. In addition, our faculty and researchers publish extensively in peer-reviewed, academic journals and in scholarly and trade presses. They also frequently provide commentary on newsworthy topics affecting Asia and U.S.-Asia relations.

Featured Publications

The book cover of The North Korean Conundrum

Balancing North Korean Human Rights and Nuclear Security

In 'The North Korean Conundrum.' experts examine the relationship between North Korean human rights and denuclearization, and how North Koreans’ limited access to information is part of the crisis.
Book cover showing a robotic hand holding an older human hand.

Exploring the Intersection of Demographics and Innovation in Asia

The new volume 'Demographics and Innovation in the Asia-Pacific' offers lessons from Asian nations about the challenges facing aging societies and the roles technology and innovation may play in rebalancing them.
Cover of the book 'The Deer and the Dragon: Southeast Asia and China in the 21st Century'

Analyzing China-Southeast Asia Relations in the 21st Centurry

In Donald K. Emmerson’s new edited volume, ‘The Deer and the Dragon,’ experts explore how Southeast Asian nations are navigating complex challenges in relation to their powerful and increasingly assertive neighbor.

APARC Monograph Series with Stanford University Press

Jointly with Stanford University Press, the Center produces the series Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, featuring academic research by our faculty and scholars.

APARC In-House Series with the Brookings Institution Press

The Center produces a self-published book series featuring policy-relevant research and analysis by our scholars and affiliates. Titles in this series are distributed by Brookings Institution Press.

Publications

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Andrew G. Walder
Books

A Decade of Upheaval

Dong Guoqiang, Andrew G. Walder
2021
The Cultural Revolution in Rural China
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Books

Agents of Disorder: Inside China's Cultural Revolution

Andrew G. Walder, Andrew G. Walder
2019

By May 1966, just seventeen years after its founding, the People’s Republic of China had become one of the most powerfully centralized states in modern history. But that summer everything changed. Mao Zedong called for students to attack intellectuals and officials who allegedly lacked commitment to revolutionary principles. Rebels responded by toppling local governments across the country, ushering in nearly two years of conflict that in places came close to civil war and resulted in nearly 1.6 million dead.

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Journal Articles

Rebellion of the Cadres: The 1967 Implosion of the Chinese Party-State

Andrew G. Walder
The China Journal , 2016

Accounts of the tumultuous initial phase of the Cultural Revolution portray party-state cadres primarily as targets of a popular insurgency. Cadres in Party and government organs in fact were themselves in widespread rebellion against their superiors after October 1966, and rebel cadres were a major force in the national wave of power seizures that destroyed the civilian state in early 1967.

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Journal Articles

Rebellion and Repression in China, 1966–1971

Andrew G. Walder
Social Science History , 2015

In the first five years after the onset of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, one of the largest political upheavals of the twentieth century paralyzed a highly centralized party state, leading to a harsh regime of military control. Despite a wave of post-Mao revelations in the 1980s, knowledge about the nationwide impact of this insurgency and its suppression remains selective and impressionistic, based primarily on a handful of local accounts.

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Books

China Under Mao: A Revolution Derailed

Andrew G. Walder
Harvard University Press , 2015

China’s Communist Party seized power in 1949 after a long period of guerrilla insurgency followed by full-scale war, but the Chinese revolution was just beginning. China Under Mao narrates the rise and fall of the Maoist revolutionary state from 1949 to 1976—an epoch of startling accomplishments and disastrous failures, steered by many forces but dominated above all by Mao Zedong.

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Journal Articles

After State Socialism: The Political Origins of Transitional Recessions

Andrew G. Walder, Andrew Isaacson, Qinglian Lu
American Sociological Review , 2015

Transitions from state socialism created a startling range of initial economic outcomes, from renewed growth to deep economic crises. Debates about the causes have largely ignored the political disruptions due to regime change that coincided with sudden initial recessions, and they have defined the problem as relative growth rates over time rather than abrupt short-run collapse. Political disruptions were severe when states broke apart into newly independent units, leading to hyperinflation, armed warfare, or both.

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Journal Articles

Foreshocks: Local Origins of Nanjing’s Qingming Demonstrations of 1976

Andrew G. Walder
China Quarterly , 2014

The “Nanjing Incident” of late March 1976 was a precursor of, and according to some analysts a trigger for, the more famous Tiananmen Square demonstrations of 4-5 April. The two protests have widely been interpreted as spontaneous outpourings of dissent from Cultural Revolution radicalism, expressed through mourning for the recently deceased Premier Zhou Enlai.

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Journal Articles

Public Housing into Private Assets: Wealth Creation in Urban China

Andrew G. Walder
Social Science Research , 2014

State socialist economies provided public housing to urban citizens at nominal cost, while allocating larger and better quality apartments to individuals in elite occupations. In transitions to a market economy, ownership is typically transferred to existing occupants at deeply discounted prices, making home equity the largest component of household wealth. Housing privatization is therefore a potentially important avenue for the conversion of bureaucratic privilege into private wealth.

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Journal Articles

Will Demographic Change Slow China's Rise?

Karen Eggleston, Jean C. Oi, Scott Rozelle, Andrew G. Walder, Xueguang Zhou, Ang Sun
The Journal of Asian Studies , 2013

China's population of 1.34 billion is now 50 percent urban, over 13 percent above age 60, and with 118 boys born for every 100 girls. For such a large population at a relatively low level of per capita income, how will aging interact with substantial gender imbalance and rapid urbanization?

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Journal Articles

Local Politics in the Chinese Cultural Revolution: Nanjing Under Military Control

Dong Guoqiang, Andrew Walder
Journal of Asian Studies , 2011

China's protracted regional conflicts of 1967 and 1968 have long been understood as struggles between conservative and radical forces whose opposed interests were so deeply rooted in existing patterns of power and privilege that they defied the imposition of military control.

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Journal Articles

From Control to Ownership: China's Managerial Revolution

Andrew G. Walder
Management and Organization Review , 2011

Over the past decade, the ownership and control of China's corporate sector has finally begun to depart fundamentally from patterns typical in the socialist past. Students of corporate governance have watched these changes with an intense curiosity about their impact on firm performance. Students of comparative economic institutions have examined them for hints of a new variety of Asian capitalism and have sought to anticipate China's international competitiveness and impact.

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Journal Articles

Factions in a Bureaucratic Setting: The Origins of Cultural Revolution Conflict in Nanjing

Dong Guoqiang, Andrew Walder
The China Journal , 2011

Mass factions in China during the first two years of the Cultural Revolution have long been understood as interest groups: collections of individuals who shared interests due to common occupations, statuses, or party affiliations. An alternative view, developed primarily with evidence about the distinctive case of Beijing students, emphasizes not the characteristics of participants but histories of political encounters in collapsing bureaucratic hierarchies.

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Books

Transitions from State Socialism: A Property Rights Perspective

Andrew G. Walder, Mark Granovetter, Richard Swedberg
Westview Press , 2011

Numerous countries have transitioned away from state socialism since the fall of Communism in the Soviet Union and its satellite states two decades ago. At the core of this phenomenon, suggests Andrew G. Walder, is “a radical change in the definition, enforcement, and allocation of various rights over property.” In the chapter “Transitions from State Socialism: A Property Rights Perspective” (The Sociology of Economic Life, 2011), Walder examines property rights changes within the context of the transition from state socialism in Hungary, China, and Vietnam.

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Journal Articles

Political Sociology and Social Movements

Andrew Walder
Annual Review of Sociology , 2009

Until the 1970s, the study of social movements was firmly within a diverse sociological tradition that explored the relationship between social structure and political behavior, and was preoccupied with explaining variation in the political orientation of movements: their ideologies, aims, motivations, or propensities for violence.

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Books

Fractured Rebellion: The Beijing Red Guard Movement

Andrew G. Walder
Harvard University Press , 2009

Fractured Rebellion is the first full-length account of the evolution of China's Red Guard Movement in Beijing, the nation's capital, from its beginnings in 1966 to its forcible suppression in 1968. Andrew Walder combines historical narrative with sociological analysis as he explores the radical student movement's crippling factionalism, devastating social impact, and ultimate failure.

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Journal Articles

Unruly Stability: Why China's Regime Has Staying Power

Andrew G. Walder
Current History , 2009

A proliferation of local protests notwithstanding, economic reforms have worked, today's youth display national pride, the leadership is unified -- and the party-state is more secure than ever. Indeed, the overall political situation in China is far more favorable for the regime than it was during the relatively tumultuous and strife-torn first decade of economic reform.

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Journal Articles

Revolution, Reform, and Status Inheritance: Urban China 1949-1996

Andrew Walder, Songhua Hu
American Journal of Sociology , 2009

Do regime change and market reform disrupt patterns of intergenerational mobility? China's political trajectory is distinctive from that of other communist regimes in two ways. During its first three decades, the regime enforced unusually restrictive barriers to elite status inheritance. And during the subsequent market transition, unlike most of its counterparts, the Communist Party survived intact.

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Journal Articles

Ownership, Organization, and Income Inequality: Market Transition in Rural Vietnam

Andrew G. Walder, Giang Hoang Nguyen
American Sociological Review , 2008

In transitional economies, the scale of economic enterprise and the allocation of
property rights shape social structures and influence income distribution. In agrarian
economies, where labor-intensive family enterprises dominate, political officials' income
advantages decline rapidly relative to those of private entrepreneurs. Larger enterprises,
however, provide greater income opportunities for officials, especially when a
government retains an ownership stake in the initial phases of reform. This article

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Journal Articles

Factional Conflict at Beijing University, 1966-1968

Andrew Walder
China Quarterly , 2006

For two years after the summer of 1966, Beijing University was racked by factional conflict and escalating violence. Despite the intensity of the struggle the factions did not express didfferences in political doctrine or orientation towards the status quo.

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Journal Articles

Ambiguity and Choice in Political Movements: The Origins of Beijing Red Guard Factionalism

Andrew Walder
American Journal of Sociology , 2006

Theories about political movements typically posit models of actor choice that contain untested static assumptions about context. Short‐run changes in these contexts-induced by rapid shifts in the properties of political institutions-can alter choices and actors' interests, rapidly transforming the political landscape. China's Red Guard Movement of 1966-68 is a case in point.

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Journal Articles

Political Office and Household Wealth: Rural China in the Deng Era

Andrew Walder, Litao Zhao
China Quarterly , 2006

Evidence from sample surveys and local field studies have long supported opposed arguments about the impact of market reform on the value of political office in the rural economy. This article reviews the evidence, describes a gradual convergence in findings, and identifies unresolved questions about qualitatively different local paths of development.

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Books

Chinese Cultural Revolution as History, The

Joseph W. Esherick, Paul G. Pickowicz, Andrew G. Walder
Stanford University Press: Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center , 2006

Based on a wide variety of unusual and only recently available sources, this book covers the entire Cultural Revolution decade (1966-76) and shows how the Cultural Revolution was experienced by ordinary Chinese at the base of urban and rural society. The contributors emphasize the comple interaction of state and society during this tumultuous period, exploring the way that events originating at the center of political power changed people's lives and how, in turn, people's responses took the Cultural Revolution in unplanned and unanticipated directions.

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Books

The Transformation of Contemporary China Studies, 1977-2002

Andrew Walder
University of California Press in David L. Szanton, ed., "The Politics of Knowledge: Area Studies and the Disciplines" , 2004

The usefulness and political implications of Area Studies programs are currently debated within the Academy and the Administration, where they are often treated as one homogenous and stagnant domain of scholarship. The essays in this volume document the various fields' distinctive character and internal heterogeneity as well as the dynamism resulting from their evolving engagements with funders, US and international politics, and domestic constituencies. The authors were chosen for their long-standing interest in the intellectual evolution of their fields.

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Journal Articles

Tan Lifu: A "Reactionary" Red Guard in Historical Perspective

Andrew G. Walder
The China Quarterly , 2004

Tan Lifu was a Red Guard leader whose August 1966 speech in defence of the Party's class line and his university's work team has long been considered key evidence for social interpretations of Red Guard factionalism. New documentation including the complete transcript of the original speech shows that Tan's case deviates sharply from the reputed profile of conservative students.

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