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Anna Fifield on a panel with Barbara Demick and Yong Suk Lee.

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Logo of the Observer Research Foundation's 'Armchair Strategist' podcast with portraits of Oriana Skylar Mastro and Arzan Tarapore

Assessing the Conventional Military Balance Between India and China

Commentary / October 9, 2020
Oriana Skylar Mastro and Arzan Tarapore join the Observer Research Foundation’s ‘Armchair Strategist’ podcast to discuss how the Indian and Chinese militaries stack up as tensions between the two...
[Left] The Impossible State by CSIS; [Right] Director Gi-Wook Shin

Democrartic Erosion in South Korea

Commentary / October 5, 2020
Gi-Wook Shin discusses the state of democracy in South Korea, and how democratic backsliding there fits into larger patterns of democratic decline underway across the globe.
Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) talks with India's Prime Minister Manmohan Singh (L) during a meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in 2013.

China-India: Talk is Cheap, But Never Free

Commentary / September 29, 2020
Nations often hesitate to negotiate with opponents during conflict. But Oriana Skylar Mastro urges that this is precisely what India and China need to do in order to curb the potential for a...
A missile display in the Military Museum in Beijing, China.

The United States Must Avoid a Nuclear Arms Race with China

Commentary / September 22, 2020
Oriana Skylar Mastro explains why U.S. nuclear policy needs to minimize the role of nuclear weapons in the U.S.-China great power competition and pave the way for arms control.
Suga Yoshihide at a press conference at the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) headquarters.

Five Ways in Which Japan's New Prime Minister Suga is Different From Abe

Commentary / September 21, 2020
Yoshihide Suga has promised to continue many of Shinzo Abe's policies and goals, but APARC's Japan Program Director Kiyoteru Tsutsui explains how Suga's background, experience, and...
An Indian army soldier watches a fighter plane from a convoy of trucks in Gagangir, India.

India and China are Taking New Risks Along Their Border

Commentary / September 17, 2020
Will diplomacy help defuse the current tensions brewing along the India-China border? Arzan Tarapore analyzes why restoring peace between the two countries may prove difficult.
Japan's outing Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and incoming Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga hold a flower bouquet

Suga Is Fit to Lead, But Are Voters Ready to Like Him?

Commentary / September 14, 2020
Japan's next prime minister is a deeply pragmatic, self-made man.
A regiment of the Indian Army practices in dress uniform for Republic Day

Rethinking the Defense Doctrine of India

Commentary / September 10, 2020
The security threats India faces along its borders require new strategies, and in order to manage and prevent future risks, the military needs to overhaul its traditional playbook of deterring and...
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks at a podium with audience seen at the front

Three Hits and Three Misses: What is Prime Minister Abe’s Legacy?

Commentary / September 1, 2020
Despite this long period as prime minister, it is not entirely clear that Abe accomplished major policy goals.
A young boy prays after releasing a floating lantern onto the Motoyasu River in front of the Atomic Bomb Dome in Hiroshima, Japan.

Why the US-Japan Partnership Prospered Despite Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Commentary / August 11, 2020
There has been little diplomatic conflict between the United States and Japan over the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during WWII, but that stability could change in the future writes...
Leaders from the ASEAN league gather onstage at the 33rd ASEAN Summit in 2018 in Singapore.

Southeast Asia's Approach to China and the Future of the Region

Commentary / August 10, 2020
In an interview with The Diplomat, Donald Emmerson discusses how factors like the South China Sea, U.S.-China competition, and how COVID-19 are affecting relations between Southeast Asia, China, and...
Prime Minister Shinzō Abe of Japan and President Donald Trump of the United States walk alongside the White House in Washington D.C.

Don't Take Our Allies for Granted, Even Japan

Commentary / July 22, 2020
As political tensions in the Asia-Pacific increase, Kiyoteru Tsutsui, senior fellow and Japan Program director, cautions the United States from taking long-standing economic and military allies like...
President Moon Jae In of South Korea during his inauguration proceedings.

Democracy in South Korea is Crumbling from Within

Commentary / July 14, 2020
South Korea is following global trends as it slides toward a “democratic depression,” warns APARC’s Gi-Wook Shin. But the dismantling of South Korean democracy by chauvinistic populism and political...
Fiery Cross Reef, Spratly Islands

Strategy in the South China Sea

Commentary / June 3, 2020
Donald K. Emmerson analyzes China’s tactics in the South China Sea and how the countries of Southeast Asia are reacting to the tensions in the disputed waterway.
united nations un vienna un city

Politicize this Pandemic, But Do So Carefully

Commentary / May 5, 2020
An open letter from scholars studying public health in China and the U.S.
A Zoom panel of Jonathan Corrado, Gi-Wook Shin, and Stephen Noerper

Gi-Wook Shin Offers Analysis of 2020 Korean National Election

Commentary / April 20, 2020
The Korea Society hosts APARC's director for a timely discussion of the recent South Korean national election.

Korean Democracy Is Sinking Under the Guise of the Rule of Law

Commentary / April 1, 2020

There is a Korean expression that means “to become soaked by a drizzle without noticing.” This metaphor is a timely warning against the gradual decline of democratic norms. Though some of the changes underlying this global phenomenon are subtle, they are producing creeping, piecemeal erosions of democracy and pluralism. The signs of democratic backsliding are now emerging everywhere in South Korean society, and a failure to recognize and robustly counter their effects may create future costs that prove unbearable. 

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Now It Gets Much Harder: Thomas Fingar and Jean Oi Discuss China’s Challenges in The Washington Quarterly

Commentary / March 19, 2020

In the last forty years, China has reemerged as a tremendous geopolitical, economic, and technological power on the world stage. But the easy phases of China’s quest for wealth and influence are over, argue Shorenstein APARC Fellow Thomas Fingar and China Program Director Jean Oi in a new article published by The Washington Quarterly.

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Video: Thomas Fingar on Past and Present Milestones in U.S.-China Relations

Commentary / January 28, 2020

In a recent interview with People's Daily Online, APARC Fellow Thomas Fingar reflects on some of the milestones in the developing and diversifying relationship between the United States and China over the past forty years. The interview is part of a series of short documentaries produced by People's Daily Online West USA to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the establishment of formal diplomatic relations between the United States and China in 1979.

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Video: David M. Lampton on U.S.-China Relations

Commentary / October 18, 2019
Oksenberg-Rohlen Fellow David M. Lampton, an expert on Chinese politics and U.S.-China relations, joins World Affairs host and Hoover Institution Visiting Fellow Markos Kounalakis in a conversation about the growing rivalry between the world's two global powers and how we might evaluate the more than forty years of Sino-American engagement since Nixon went to Beijing in 1972.
 
Why has engagement weakened so precipitously in the last several years?
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Video: Donald K. Emmerson on Strategic Thinking in Southeast Asia

Commentary / October 9, 2019
What is strategic thinking? Are the foreign policies of some Southeast Asian states more strategic than those of others? If so, in what way, and with what implications for U.S. policy?
 
APARC's Southeast Asia Program Director Donald K.
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On Korean Nationalism and Its Role in the Escalating Japan-South Korea Friction

Commentary / September 5, 2019

Tension and discord in Japan-South Korea relations are nothing new, but the unfortunate, intensifying conflict between the two countries — a manifestation of right-wing Japanese nationalism and left-wing South Korean nationalism — seems headed toward a collision course. To understand the escalating friction between Tokyo and Seoul one must recognize the unique characteristics of Korean nationalism, and particularly its historical origins, development, and political role in shaping Korean attitudes toward Japan.

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