APARC - Korea Program Courses

Front entrance to Encina Hall, Stanford

Korea Program Courses

Engaging Stanford students in exploring challenges and policy solutions critical to contemporary Korea and U.S.-Korea relations

    Our Education Mission
  • Our Education Mission
  • AY 2019-20 Courses
  • AY 2018-19 Courses
  • AY 2017-18 Courses
  • AY 2016-17 Courses
  • Courses Taught in Previous Years

Our Education Mission

Teaching plays a central role in our mission to promote the study of contemporary Korea from comparative and regional perspectives. Every year Korea Program faculty and fellows teach undergraduate- and graduate-level courses at Stanford. These courses are offered through multiple departments and schools across the University, including economics, political science, sociology, education, and business.

Explore our courses in the tabs below. Many of the courses listed have syllabi attached. For up-to-date course and registration information please refer to the Stanford Bulletin.

AY 2019-20 Courses

  • Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia (INTLPOL 224, Winter), Yong Suk Lee
  • Kangnam Style: K-pop and the Globalization of Korean Soft Power (KOREA 101N, Autumn), Dafna Zur
  • Narratives of Modern and Contemporary Korea (KOREA 120/220, Autumn), Dafna Our
  • Political Sociology (SOC 310, Winter), Gi-Wook Shin

AY 2018-19 Courses

  • Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia (ECON 124/IPS 224; 2018-19 Spring), Yong Suk Lee

  • Kangnam Style: Korean Soft Power in the Global Economy (KOREA 101N; 2018-19 Winter), Dafna Zur

  • Modern Korean History (HISTORY 95/195; 2018-19 Spring), Yumi Moon

  • Narratives of Modern and Contemporary Korea (KOREA 220; 2018-19 Autumn), Dafna Zur

  • Nations and Nationalism (SOC 309; 2018-19 Winter), Gi-Wook Shin

  • The Nature of Knowledge: Science and Literature in East Asia (KOREA 251; 2018-19 Spring), Dafna Zur

  • North Korea in Historical Perspective (HISTORY 390; 2018-19 Autumn, Winter), Yumi Moon

  • Politics, Economics, and Society of North Korea (EASTASN 189K/ 289K; 2018-19 Winter), Andray Abrahamian

  • State and Society in Korea (SOC 211; 2018-19 Winter), Gi-Wook Shin

AY 2017-18 Courses

  • Asia-Pacific Transformation (SOC 167A/267A; 2017-18 Spring), Gi-Wook Shin

  • Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia (ECON 124/INTLPOL 224; 2017-18 Spring); Yong Suk Lee

  • Everybody Eats: The Language, Culture, and Ethics of Food in East Asia (HUMCORE 22; 2017-18 Winter), Dafna Zur

  • Kangnam Style: Korean Soft Power in the Global Economy (KOREA 101N; 2017-18 Winter), Dafna Zur

  • Modern Korea (HISTORY 392G; 2017-18 Autumn), Yumi Moon

  • Modern Korean History (HISTORY 95/195; 2017-18 Spring), Yumi Moon

  • More Real than Fiction: Perspectives of History and Theory in Modern Korean Literature (KOREA 250/350; 2017-18 Winter), Dafna Zur

  • Movies and Empire in East Asia (HISTORY 290E/390E; 2017-18 Spring), Yumi Moon

  • North Korea in Historical Perspective (HISTORY 290/390; 2017-18 Autumn), Yumi Moon

AY 2016-17 Courses

  • Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia (ECON 124/IPS 224; 2016-17 Spring), Yong Suk Lee

  • Modern Korean History (HISTORY 95/195; 2016-17 Spring), Yumi Moon

  • Movies and Empire in East Asia (HISTORY 390E; 2016-17 Spring), Yumi Moon

  • North Korea in Historical Perspective (HISTORY 290/390; 2016-17 Fall), Yumi Moon

  • State and Society in Korea (INTNLREL 143/ SOC 211, 2016-17 Spring), Gi-Wook Shin

Courses Taught in Previous Years

I had the great fortune of being part of the Korea Program as a doctoral student studying South Korean social movements. The Program provided the ideal context to engage with passionate scholars and develop my research.
Paul Y. Chang
Assistant Professor, Underwood International College, Yonsei University

Discover More at the Korea Program