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Bukchon Hanok Village with modern buildings in the background in Seoul, South Korea

Korea Program

Promoting multidisciplinary, social science-oriented research on policy-relevant Korean affairs

Who We Are

The Korea Program at Stanford’s Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center is a West Coast hub of scholarship on contemporary Korea and the issues shaping the future of the Korean Peninsula and U.S.-Korea relations. Our work examines these topics from regional and comparative perspectives through cultural, political, and economic lens. We train and support emerging Korea scholars and convene experts from academia, government, business, and civil society for dialogue, research, and publishing activities that inform policymakers in the United States and Korea and strengthen the bonds between the two countries.

 

In the Spotlight

Protesters participate in a rally oppose a planned visit by Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi near the Chinese Embassy on November 25, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea.

The Rise of Anti-Chinese Sentiments in South Korea: Political and Security Implications

Gi-Wook Shin shares insight into rising anti-China sentiments in South Korea and their implications for the upcoming South Korean presidential election.
Solar panels, portraits of Young Sook Yoo, Suh-Yong Chung, and So-Min Cheong, with text about climate change challenges and responses in Korea

Climate Change: Challenges and Responses in Korea

As part the Shorenstein APARC's fall series Climate Change in Asia, a panel of climate change experts discussed the challenges facing Korea and the country's mitigation efforts and policy responses.
crowd in seoul

[Us and Them] I’m Korean, You’re Not, and There’s a Fine Line You Can’t Cross

In a recent interview with The Korea Herald, Gi-Wook Shin discusses ethnic homogeneity, its nationalist roots, and the limitations to building multicultural identity in South Korea.
Using the UN to Create Accountability for Human Rights Crimes in North Korea

Using the UN to Create Accountability for Human Rights Crimes in North Korea

Recently at the Korea Program

Experts on human rights agree that the UN needs to work through multiple channels to support ongoing investigations and build evidence for future litigations in order to create accountability and pressure the DPRK to desist in committing human rights crimes.

(Right to left): Gi-Wook Shin, ROK Ambassador to the US Cho Yoon-je, and Siegfried S. Hecker seated at a conference room at Stanford

Our Research

Together with academics and stakeholders in government and civil society, we explore Korean issues and policy solutions through economic, social, political, and security lens.

Hallym-Stanford Innovation Cnference Panel

Our Publications

We share our research findings through peer-reviewed journals, scholarly and trade presses, policy reports, and Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center’s publishing program.

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