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Political scientist Dr. Diana Stanescu and sociologist Mary-Collier Wilks will join APARC as Shorenstein postdoctoral fellows on contemporary Asia for the 2021-22 academic year.

Contributing authors to the new volume 'Demographics and Innovation in the Asia-Pacific' convened for a virtual book launch and discussion of the challenges facing aging societies in East Asia and the roles technology and innovation may play in rebalancing them.

In one of the first studies of service sector robotics, APARC scholars examine the impacts of robots on nursing homes in Japan. They find that robot adoption may not be detrimental to labor and may help address the challenges of rapidly aging societies.

Ahead of President-elect Biden’s inauguration and on the heels of the attack on the U.S. Capitol by a pro-Trump mob that has left America shaken, an APARC-wide expert panel provides a region-by-region analysis of what’s next for U.S. policy towards Asia and recommendations for the new administration.

Both Japan's Suga and the incoming Biden administration should maintain the language of the "free and open Indo-Pacific" for consistency and to signal their ongoing commitment to maintaining a firm policy stance on China's ambitions.

Surging coronavirus cases and ongoing political scandals have docked Suga's approval ratings, but successfully handling the upcoming Olympics and taking further strides with the United States, ASEAN, and South Korea may help him rebound.

Abe's resignation, the COVID-19 pandemic, and delaying the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic games have disrupted Japan's efforts to re-establish itself as a strong leader, both domestically and internationally, but it still has a chance to launch a comeback moment.

President-elect Biden's early conversations with Japan's prime minister Yoshihide Suga seem to signal a renewed commitment to coordination on issues of security, environmentalism, human rights, and China's influence.

Yoshihide Suga has promised to continue many of Shinzo Abe's policies and goals, but APARC's Japan Program Director Kiyoteru Tsutsui explains how Suga's background, experience, and political vision differ from the previous administration.

Japan's next prime minister is a deeply pragmatic, self-made man.

In an interview with Stanford News, Gi-Wook Shin, the director of APARC and the Korea Program, describes how divergent perspectives on the legacies of WWII continue to shape different understandings of history and impact inter-Asia and U.S.-Asia relations.

Yong Suk Lee and Karen Eggleston’s ongoing research into the impact of robotics and AI in different industries indicates that integrating tech into labor markets adjusts, but doesn’t replace, the long-term roles of humans and robots.

To support Stanford students working in the area of contemporary Asia, the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Center is offering research assistant positions for the fall, winter, and spring quarters of the 2020-21 academic year.

There has been little diplomatic conflict between the United States and Japan over the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during WWII, but that stability could change in the future, writes Japan Program Director Kiyoteru Tsutsui in an op-ed for The Hill.

As political tensions in the Asia-Pacific increase, Kiyoteru Tsutsui, senior fellow and Japan Program director, cautions the United States from taking long-standing economic and military allies like Japan for granted.

Tsutsui, whose research focuses on social movements, globalization, human rights and political sociology, will lead the Japan Program at the Asia-Pacific Research Center.

Discover More at the Japan Program

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